Legacy Genealogy Cruise 2016 announced! Southbound Alaska - September 2-9, 2016

The 13th annual Legacy Genealogy Cruise, to be held September 2-9, 2016, departs from Seward, Alaska aboard Royal Caribbean's Radiance of the Seas ship and will feature top genealogy speakers including members of the Legacy Family Tree staff. We will cruise Alaska's Inside Passage and visit the following ports:

  • Seward
  • Juneau
  • Skagway
  • Ketchikan
  • Vancouver, BC

Optional 6-Day Pre-Cruise Tour

If this is your first (or last) trip to Alaska, you'll love the optional pre-cruise tour we have arranged. Here's some of the places we'll visit between August 27 and September 2:

  • Riverboat Discovery Boat
  • Transfer Fairbanks to Denali
  • Denali Discovery Program
  • Denali Natural History Tour
  • Talkeetna Alaskan Lodge
  • Anchorage
  • Seward Wind Song Lodge
  • Resurrection Bay Cruise

Genealogy Classes at Sea
While at sea attend classes taught by some of genealogy's finest educators, Legacy Family Tree webinar speakers, and Legacy developers. In addition to the classes, you will benefit from the small-group sessions and lots of time to learn from each other.

The Ship

Hungry for a dazzling at-sea experience that combines sleek swiftness, panoramic vistas, and an array of our best new dining options? Look no further than Radiance of the Seas®. With acres of glass enclosing the nine-story central atrium, elevators facing the sea, and floor-to-ceiling windows throughout, you'll never be at a loss for an incredible view. Plus, you can choose from eight different dining experiences, ranging from casual eats at Boardwalk Doghouse, to the family-style Italian fare at Giovanni's Table, to the sizzling skewers of Samba Grill Brazilian Steakhouse.

Reservations or questions
Prices begin at $640 per person, based on double occupancy. The price includes:

  • Genealogy classes
  • Shipboard accommodations
  • Ocean transportation
  • Meals
  • Some beverages
  • Most onboard entertainment

Transportation to Seward, port charges, gratuities, government fees/taxes, and optional tours are extra.

Pricing for the pre-cruise tours + the cruise begin at $4,058 per person (above exclusions apply).

Click here to learn more or to securely book your cruise online.

To reserve a cabin, or ask questions, contact our travel coordinator, Christy, at 1-425-222-6222 or send an email to LegacyFamilyTreeCruise@gmail.com.

More Information

For class descriptions, frequently asked questions, descriptions of the places we'll visit, or pictures of our past cruises, visit http://www.legacyfamilytree.com/CruiseInfo_2016.asp.


Break Down Brick Walls in Eastern European Research - free webinar by Lisa Alzo now available for limited time

2015-09-02-image500blog

The recording of today's webinar, "Break Down Brick Walls in Eastern European Research" by Lisa Alzo is now available to view for free at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com.

Through sample case studies, you will learn about:

  • lesser-utilized research tactics,
  • key resources,
  • and repositories

to find your elusive Eastern European ancestors.

View the Recording at FamilyTreeWebinars.com

If you could not make it to the live event or just want to watch it again, the 1 hour 31 minute recording of "Break Down Brick Walls in Eastern European Research"is now available to view in our webinar library for free for a limited time. Or watch it at your convenience with an annual or monthly webinar membership.

Coupon code

Use webinar coupon code - eastern - for 10% off anything at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com or www.LegacyFamilyTreeStore.com, valid through Monday, September 7, 2015.

QDCZECHLegacy QuickGuide: Czech Genealogy by Lisa Alzo 2.95

Researching your Czech ancestors can be challenging if you don't know where or how to begin. Boundary changes, record availability, and unfamiliar languages can complicate the process. To ensure success, you will need to utilize a variety of print and online resources. The Czech Genealogy Legacy QuickGuide contains useful information to get you started including the best places to identify an immigrant ancestor’s original name and hometown, the key North American records to search, and how to locate vital registers, land, and other documents  in the Czech Republic. This handy 4-page PDF guide can be used on your computer or mobile device for anytime access.
 

QDSLOVAKLegacy QuickGuide: Slovak Genealogy by Lisa Alzo 2.95

Researching Slovak ancestry can be confusing especially when you don't have an understanding of the country’s history or know how to begin your research. The Slovak Genealogy Legacy QuickGuide™ contains useful information to get you started including the best places to identify an immigrant ancestor’s original name and hometown, and where to find key record groups such as census, military, ship passenger and immigration records. This handy 4-page PDF guide can be used on your computer or mobile device for anytime access.
 

Webinar Memberships/Subscriptions

Webinar Members get:

  • On-demand access to the entire webinar archives (now 259 classes, 387 hours of genealogy education)
  • On-demand access to the instructor handouts (now 1,169 pages)
  • On-demand access to the live webinars' chat logs
  • 5% off all products at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com (must be logged in at checkout)
  • Access to all future recordings for the duration of their membership
  • Chance for a members-only door prize during each live webinar
  • Access to register for bonus members-only webinars
  • Ability to view which webinars you are registered for

Introductory pricing:

  • Annual membership: $49.95/year (that's about the cost of 5 webinar CDs)
  • Monthly membership: $9.95/month

Click here to subscribe.

Register for our upcoming webinars (free)

  • Research Your Swedish Ancestors in Living Color Using ArkivDigital Online by Kathy Meade. September 9.
  • Technology and Techniques for Differentiating Two People with the Same Name by Geoff Rasmussen. September 11.
  • Researching Your Dutch Ancestors by Yvette Hoitink. September 16.
  • Researching Your Ancestors in England and Wales by Kirsty Gray. September 23.
  • Maps Tell Some of the Story for the African-Ancestored Genealogist by Angela Walton-Raji. September 25.
  • Using Periodicals to Find Your Ancestors by Gena Philibert-Ortega. September 30.
  • Wearables and Genealogy - Wacky and Wild or Worth the Wait by Thomas MacEntee. October 7.
  • Colonial Immigration - The English Pioneers of Early America by Beth Foulk. October 14.
  • Billions of Records, Billions of Stories by Devin Ashby. October 16.
  • What Happened to the State of Frankland - Using Tennessee's Pre-Statehood Records by Mark Lowe. October 21.
  • Complex Evidence - What is It? How Does it Work? And Why Does it Matter? by Warren Bittner. October 28.
  • Researching with Karen! by Karen Clifford. November 4.
  • Organizing Your Genetic Genealogy by Diahan Southard. November 11.
  • Bringing it All Together and Leaving a Permanent Record by Tom Kemp. November 13.
  • Mapping Madness by Ron Arons. November 18.
  • Stories in Stone - Cemetery Research by Gail Blankenau. December 2.
  • Thinking about Becoming an Accredited Genealogist? by Apryl Cox and Kelly Summers. December 9.
  • Pointing Fingers at Ancestors' Siblings - Breaking Down Brick Walls with Collateral Research by Marian Pierre-Louis. December 16.

Click here to register. Or click here register for multiple webinars at the same time.

Print the 2015 webinar brochure here.

See you online!


Webinar Wednesdays (and more) Now Available on your TV with Chromecast

2015-08-28_0002_edited-1

What's that on my TV? If you said "Webinar Wednesday" you're right!

My brand new Chromecast from Google arrived in today's mail and now I can watch anything in our webinar library from the comfort of my living room recliner on my 55" wide-screen TV without having to connect my laptop to the TV. Talk about genealogy and technology heaven!

ChromecastHere's how it works. 

1. Purchase the Chromecast device. Amazon sells it for $30-35 here.

2. Plug it in to one of the HDMI ports on your television.

3. Plug the included USB power cable into one end of the Chromecast, and the other end into an open USB port on your television.

4. Follow the on-screen instructions to complete the setup.

What you can watch

OK, it's not just webinars from our library you can watch on your TV using Chromecast. You can broadcast anything to your TV from your:

  • Main computer (using the Chrome browser and extension)
  • Laptop (using the Chrome browser)
  • Tablet (using the Google Cast app)
  • Smart phone (using the Google Cast app)

Also look for the Google Cast button in video apps such as Netflix, YouTube, Hulu and more. 

Casting

Once everything's set up (it's really pretty easy) look for the Google Cast button in the upper right of your Chrome browser and click.

Cast1

 

Here's what the button's options look like:

Cast2

 

And here's another options screen (click the small arrow in the upper right). This lets you cast not just a browser's tab, but your entire monitor.

Cast

And here's what my 9-year-old, Braden, looks like as he watches our Genealogy Serendipity webinar from the couch.

2015 08 28_0008_edited-1

 

I'm not a big TV watcher, but with this technology, I love that I can catch up on or re-watch webinars in our library on the big screen. I might even do it with a bowl of popcorn tonight.


Register for Webinar Wednesday - Break Down Brick Walls in Eastern European Research by Lisa Alzo

Logowhite

Got Eastern European ancestors? Learn how to find them from Lisa Alzo in this week's Webinar Wednesday.

Through sample case studies, you will learn about:

  • lesser-utilized research tactics,
  • key resources,
  • and repositories

to find your elusive Eastern European ancestors.

Join us and Lisa Alzo for the live webinar Wednesday, September 2, 2015 at 2pm Eastern U.S. Register today to reserve your virtual seat. Registration is free but space is limited to the first 1,000 people to join that day. Before joining, please visit www.java.com to ensure you have the latest version of Java which our webinar software requires. When you join, if you receive a message that the webinar is full, you know we've reached the 1,000 limit, so we invite you to view the recording which should be published to the webinar archives within an hour or two of the event's conclusion.

Registerbut

Or register for multiple webinars at once by clicking here.

Not sure if you already registered?

On the Upcoming Webinars tab, login to view the webinars you are already signed up for (available for annual or monthly webinar subscribers).

Test Your Webinar Connection

To ensure that your webinar connection is ready to go, click here.

Can't make it to the live event?

No worries. Its recording will be available for a limited time. Webinar Subscribers have unlimited access to all webinar recordings for the duration of their membership.

About the presenter

Alzolisa-144Lisa A.  Alzo. M.F.A. is a freelance writer, instructor, and internationally recognized lecturer, specializing in Slovak/Eastern European genealogical research, writing your family history, and using the Internet to trace female and immigrant ancestors. She is the author of nine books, including the award-winning Three Slovak Women, and hundreds of magazine articles, and writes the blog "The Accidental Genealogist."

View Lisa's other webinars here.

Add it to your Google Calendar

With our Google Calendar button, you will never forget our upcoming webinars. Simply click the button to add it to your calendar. You can then optionally embed the webinar events (and even turn them on and off) into your own personal calendar. If you have already added the calendar, you do not have to do it again - the new webinar events will automatically appear.

Webinar time

The webinar will be live on Wednesday, September 2, 2015 at:

  • 2pm Eastern (U.S.)
  • 1pm Central
  • 12pm Mountain
  • 11am Pacific

Or use this Time Zone Converter.

Here's how to attend:

  1. Register at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com today. It's free!
  2. You will receive a confirmation email containing a link to the webinar.
  3. You will receive a reminder email both 1 day and 1 hour prior to the live webinar.
  4. Calculate your time zone by clicking here.
  5. Make sure you have the latest version of Java installed on your computer. Check at www.java.com.
  6. Check your GoToWebinar connection here.
  7. Click on the webinar link (found in confirmation and reminder emails) prior to the start of the webinar. Arrive early as the room size is limited to the first 1,000 arrivals that day.
  8. Listen via headset (USB headsets work best), your computer speakers, or by phone.

We look forward to seeing you all there!


FamilySearch Records Update: New records for Colombia, France, Peru, Philippines, and the United States

Significant birth, marriage, and death records for Imperia, Italy and Savonna, Italy were published this week. Georgia county marriages have also been added, dating back to 1785! Discover these and additional collections updated this week by selecting the links below.

COLLECTION

INDEXED RECORDS

DIGITAL RECORDS

COMMENTS

Colombia Catholic Church Records 1600-2012

0

1,002,173

Added images to an existing collection

France Finistère Quimper et Léon Diocese Catholic Parish Records 1772-1863

144,443

0

Added indexed records to an existing collection

Illinois Adams County Card Index to Deaths 1877-1990

95,523

96,875

New indexed records and images collection

Peru Lima Civil Registration 1874-1996

862,440

304

Added indexed records and images to an existing collection

Philippines Manila Civil Registration 1899-1984

0

4,088,394

Added images to an existing collection

Philippines Pangasinan Civil Registration 1945-1981

84,935

0

Added indexed records to an existing collection

Texas County Marriage Records 1837-1977

586,960

0

Added indexed records to an existing collection

United States Census 1890

15

0

Added indexed records to an existing collection

United States Obituaries American Historical Society of Germans from Russia 1899-2012

0

4,154

Added images to an existing collection

Wisconsin County Marriages 1836-1911

213,905

0

Added indexed records to an existing collection

Help Us Publish More Free Records Online

Searchable historical records are made available on FamilySearch.org through the help of thousands of online volunteers worldwide. These volunteers transcribe (or index) information from digital copies of handwritten records to make them easily searchable online. More volunteers are always needed (particularly those who can read foreign languages) to keep pace with the large number of digital images being published weekly online on FamilySearch.org. Learn how you can volunteer to help provide free access to the world’s historical genealogical records online at FamilySearch.org/Indexing.
 
About FamilySearch International
FamilySearch is the largest genealogy organization in the world. FamilySearch is a nonprofit, volunteer-driven organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch and its predecessors have been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. Patrons may access FamilySearch services and resources for free at FamilySearch.org or through more than 4,600 family history centers in 132 countries, including the main Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.

New Legacy QuickTip Video - Using the Character Ribbon

We have another great Legacy QuickTip Video for you today! Learn:

  • How to use Legacy's Character ribbon to add special characters like ä, å, ö and more to your names, places, and notes.

This QuickTip was presented live during the after-webinar party of this week's German Names and Naming Patterns webinar by Jim Beidler.

Click here for the video.

Charactermapblog

Click here for more Legacy QuickTip videos.


Handwriting Helps: The Eszett, Windows Character Map, and Legacy's Character Ribbon

Can you interpret this name?

1

Neither could I. Until I remembered something that Jim Beidler taught in Wednesday's webinar, German Names and Naming Patterns. And while this was from a Swedish record, the principle of the handwriting applies.

In the Question/Answer session (timestamp 1:20:21) a viewer asked Jim to explain the "double-S". He taught that this letter, known as an eszett, is easily confused with a capital B, and is no longer used in modern German handwriting. Here's what it looks like typed: 

ß

Can you pick out the eszett in the image above? Knowing that this character represents back-to-back s's (is that even how to write the plural of s?) makes the surname easier to interpret. And with a little familial context, it is most certainly:

Andersson

Any guesses on the given name? Try real hard not to look at the answer in the next line.

Per

I never would have figured out the given name if it stood alone like this, but with the surrounding information in the record and what I had already learned about the family, it was easier to decipher that this was indeed Per Andersson, my great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great grandfather, born in 1709 in Sweden.

Character Map

With my newly-found interest in researching my Swedish ancestors (thanks to another recent webinar) I've been wearing out the Windows 10 Character Map to type letters not found in my English alphabet. To find this tool, press the Windows button + Q, which brings up the Search dialog. Then type Character Map and click on its result. This is what it looks like:

Charactermap 

Click on the letter you want to use, and look for the "Keystroke" in the lower right corner.

Charactermap2

Zooming in a bit, we can see that to type this character, you'd need to press the ALT key, and then type the numbers 0223.

Keystroke

Here's the result:

ß

So, I've been memorizing the keystrokes for ä, å, and ö, the letters I use most commonly when doing data entry for my Swedish ancestors.

ALT+0228 = ä

ALT+0229 = å

ALT+0246 = ö

Legacy's Character Ribbon

Legacy has a built-in tool that makes it 100 times easier than using Windows' Character Map. Basically, any place you can type, Legacy's Character Ribbon will be available. By default, 6 common characters are shown. Just click once on the desired character, and it will be typed wherever your cursor is. 

Charactermap3

 

To use or add other characters to the ribbon, click on the blue box, double-click on the desired character, and click the Return Characters button. There's room on the ribbon for your favorite 8.

If you want to see this in action, check out the after-webinar party in this webinar (timestamp 1:34:36).

Lesson learned

Never miss Webinar Wednesday. Although the topic may not appear to be relevant to your immediate research, what you learn can often be applied to what you are working on. So thanks to the viewer in Wednesday's webinar for asking the question, and thanks to Jim Beidler for a terrific explanation!


Spreadsheets 301: un-Excel-ed Tips and Tricks - new webinar by Mary Roddy now available

New Webinar in the Legacy Library!

Announcement

Learn new ways to make data entry faster and easier for your genealogy, and a few tips that will make your spreadsheets more attractive.

See how quickly Magic Fill will help you complete a list and watch Mary turn a spreadsheet "on its ear" to flip rows and columns.

Mary Roddy will also teach you about:

  • Magic corner
  • Magic fill for common patterns
  • Copy versus move
  • Heading over multiple columns
  • Filtering
  • Importing data
  • Smart sorting
  • Formulas
  • Math with words
  • Format painter
  • Transpose
  • Google Drive
  • Pulling it all together

Members Login to Watch Now!

Watchvideo

Watchpreview

Not a member yet?

Legacy Family Tree Webinars provides genealogy education where-you-are through live and recorded online webinars and videos. Learn from the best instructors in genealogy including Thomas MacEntee, Judy Russell, J. Mark Lowe, Lisa Louise Cooke, Megan Smolenyak, Tom Jones, and many more. Learn at your convenience. On-demand classes are available 24 hours a day! All you need is a computer or mobile device with an Internet connection.

Subscribe today and get access to this BONUS members-only webinar AND all of this:

  • All 258 classes in the library (385 hours of quality genealogy education)
  • 1,153 pages of instructors' handouts
  • Chat logs from the live webinars
  • Additional 5% off anything at FamilyTreeWebinars.com
  • Chance for a bonus subscribers-only door prize during each live webinar
  • Additional members-only webinars

It's just $49.95/year or $9.95/month.

Click here to subscribe.

Free Webinars

Our public live webinars are all free. Click here to see what's on the schedule.


Find Your Ancestor on Ships Passenger Lists to Canada After 1865

Genealogists are often looking for our immigrant ancestor's arrival in North America. Finding an ancestor on a ship's passenger list depends on the country of departure and the country of arrival.  Most countries did not keep outbound lists so genealogists must find out what lists survived in the arrival country and where they are held.

In 1803, the British Parliament enacted legislation to regulate vessels carrying emigrants to North America. The master of vessel was required to prepare a list of passengers and to deposit it at the port of departure. 

Ships passenger lists arriving in the United States were kept from 1820 on. Canadian passenger lists are another story. There are no comprehensive ships passenger lists of immigrants arriving in Canada prior to 1865. Until that year, the government did not require that shipping companies keep their passenger manifests. 

If your ancestor arrived in Canada after 1865 you are in luck. Library and Archives Canada has Canadian ships passenger lists from 1865 to 1935 online. The lists contain information on each passenger such as name, age, country of origin, occupation and intended destination. Formats differ by years and unfortunately there is little consistency.

Researchers can search Library and Archives Canada (LAC) Passenger Lists, 1865-1922 by ship name or year of arrival.   These lists are not indexed by individuals on Library and Archives Canada except for arrivals in Quebec. Available years vary by Arrival ports.

  • Québec (May 1st, 1865 to April 24th, 1900) - searchable by passenger name
  • Halifax, Nova Scotia (January 1881 to October 2, 1922)
  • Saint John, New Brunswick (January 4, 1900 to September 30, 1922)
  • North Sydney, Nova Scotia (November 22, 1906 to August 31, 1922)
  • Vancouver, British Columbia (January 4, 1905 to September 28, 1922)
  • Victoria, British Columbia (April 18, 1905 to September 30, 1922)
  • via New York (1906-1931) and other eastern United States ports (1905-1928) - these are lists of passengers stating they were going on to Canada. In 1905 the Canadian immigration service began to collect extracts of passenger lists kept at the east coast ports of New York, Baltimore, Boston, Portland, Philadelphia and Providence
1913 Passenger list on Ancestr.com
1913 Passenger List courtesy Ancestry.com

 

FamilySearch has Canadian Passenger Lists 1881-1922   Genealogists can search the index by surname. Images of ship's passenger lists are also available for the ports of Quebec City, 1900-1921; Halifax, 1881-1922; Saint John, 1900-1912; North Sydney, 1906-1912; Vancouver, 1905-1912; Victoria, 1905-1912; New York, 1906-1912; and Eastern US Ports, 1905-1912. The lists for United States ports include only those names of passengers with intentions of proceeding directly to Canada.

You can also search the Passenger Lists and Border Entries, 1925-1935 database on Library and Archives Canada.  This is a series of old nominal indexes for the period 1925 to 1935. They provide the volumes and page numbers on which the names of Canadian immigrants appear in the passenger lists. The indexes generally do not include the names of returning Canadians, tourists, visitors and immigrants en route to the United States. To locate those references, researchers must consult the original passenger lists.

From 1919–1924 individual manifest forms (Form 30) were often used instead of passenger lists as the official immigration record. Form 30 records consist of 96 digitized films which are available for browsing on Collections Canada.

1920Form30FUllerCharles great grandpa 1920 copy
Example of Form 30 front side for my great-grandfather Charles Fuller, courtesy Ancestry.com

 

1920 Form30FullerCharles great grandpa 1920p2 copy
Example of Form 30 reverse side Charles Fuller courtesy Ancestry.com

 

Library and Archives Canada also holds the passenger lists for Home Children, 1869-1930. Between 1869 and the late 1930s, over 100,000 young people were sent to Canada from Great Britain during the child emigration movement. After arriving by ship, the children were sent to distributing homes, and then went on to farmers in the area. Although many of the children were poorly treated and abused, others experienced a much better life than what awaited them in England.

If you are searching for an arrival from January 1, 1936 onwards, these records of immigrants arriving at Canadian land and seaports are in the custody of Citizenship and Immigration Canada. They must be requested from that agency by a Canadian citizen or an individual residing in Canada.

For a fee of $5.00 (cheque or money order payable to the Receiver General for Canada) researchers can submit a request to:

Citizenship and Immigration Canada
Access to Information and Privacy Division
Ottawa, ON  K1A 1L1

The submitter must indicate that the record is being requested under Access to Information and a signed consent from the person concerned or proof that he or she has been deceased for 20 years. If the person would be more than 110 years old, no proof of death is required.

If you do not know when your ancestor arrived in Canada, there are other records you can search for clues:

  • The 1901, 1906, 1911, 1916 and 1921 Canadian Census indicate year of arrival for immigrants.
  • Land Records are helpful because immigrants often applied for land shortly after arrival.
  • Death Records sometimes indicate how many years the deceased had resided in Canada.
  • Statistic Canada's National Registration of 1940  asked year of arrival. This was the compulsory registration of all persons, 16 years of age or older, between 1940 and 1946

Other free resources for miscellaneous ships' passenger lists arriving in Canada after 1865 are:

Ships' Passenger Lists 1865 to present at Olive Tree Genealogy

Ships' Passenger Lists from 1865 on The Ships List

 

Lorine McGinnis Schulze is a Canadian genealogist who has been involved with genealogy and history for more than thirty years. In 1996 Lorine created the Olive Tree Genealogy website and its companion blog. Lorine is the author of many published genealogical and historical articles and books.


German Names and Naming Patterns - free webinar by Jim Beidler now available for limited time

2015-08-26-image500blog

The recording of today's excellent webinar, "German Names and Naming Patterns" by James M. Beidler PLUS the after-webinar party is now available to view for free at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com.

Jim will teach you about:

  • The naming patterns and quirks that are found in German names
  • How to deal with families who used the identical name for surviving children

This presentation demystifies these and other potential problems with our German research.

View the Recording at FamilyTreeWebinars.com

If you could not make it to the live event or just want to watch it again, the 1 hour 47 minute recording of "Digital Family Reunions" PLUS the after-webinar party is now available to view in our webinar library for free for a limited time. Or watch it at your convenience with an annual or monthly webinar membership.

Coupon code

Use webinar coupon code - patterns - for 10% off anything at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com or www.LegacyFamilyTreeStore.com, valid through Monday, August 31, 2015.

GermanThe Family Tree German Genealogy Guide by Jim Beidler 19.95

Explore Your German Ancestry!
 
Follow your family tree back to its roots in Bavaria, Baden, Prussia, Hesse, Saxony, Wurttemburg and beyond. This in-depth genealogy guide will walk you step by step through the exciting journey of researching your German heritage, whether your ancestors came from lands now in modern-day Germany or other German-speaking areas of Europe, including Austria, Switzerland, and enclaves across Eastern Europe.
 
In this book, you'll learn how to:
  • Retrace your German immigrant ancestors' voyage from Europe to America.
  • Pinpoint the precise place in Europe your ancestors came from.
  • Uncover birth, marriage, death, church, census, court, military, and other records documenting your ancestors' lives.
  • Access German records of your family from your own hometown.
  • Decipher German-language records, including unfamiliar German script.
  • Understand German names and naming patterns that offer research clues.

You'll also find maps, timelines, sample records and resource lists throughout the book for quick and easy reference. Whether you're just beginning your family tree or a longtime genealogy researcher, the Family Tree German Genealogy Guide will help you conquer the unique challenges of German research and uncover your ancestors' stories. 

Paperback: 240 pages, 9" x 7"
 

Webinar Memberships/Subscriptions

Webinar Members get:

  • On-demand access to the entire webinar archives (now 257 classes, 385 hours of genealogy education)
  • On-demand access to the instructor handouts (now 1,153 pages)
  • On-demand access to the live webinars' chat logs
  • 5% off all products at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com (must be logged in at checkout)
  • Access to all future recordings for the duration of their membership
  • Chance for a members-only door prize during each live webinar
  • Access to register for bonus members-only webinars
  • Ability to view which webinars you are registered for

Introductory pricing:

  • Annual membership: $49.95/year (that's about the cost of 5 webinar CDs)
  • Monthly membership: $9.95/month

Click here to subscribe.

Register for our upcoming webinars (free)

  • Break Down Brick Walls in Eastern European Research - Tips, Tools and Tricks by Lisa Alzo. September 2.
  • Research Your Swedish Ancestors in Living Color Using ArkivDigital Online by Kathy Meade. September 9.
  • Technology and Techniques for Differentiating Two People with the Same Name by Geoff Rasmussen. September 11.
  • Researching Your Dutch Ancestors by Yvette Hoitink. September 16.
  • Researching Your Ancestors in England and Wales by Kirsty Gray. September 23.
  • Maps Tell Some of the Story for the African-Ancestored Genealogist by Angela Walton-Raji. September 25.
  • Using Periodicals to Find Your Ancestors by Gena Philibert-Ortega. September 30.
  • Wearables and Genealogy - Wacky and Wild or Worth the Wait by Thomas MacEntee. October 7.
  • Colonial Immigration - The English Pioneers of Early America by Beth Foulk. October 14.
  • Billions of Records, Billions of Stories by Devin Ashby. October 16.
  • What Happened to the State of Frankland - Using Tennessee's Pre-Statehood Records by Mark Lowe. October 21.
  • Complex Evidence - What is It? How Does it Work? And Why Does it Matter? by Warren Bittner. October 28.
  • Researching with Karen! by Karen Clifford. November 4.
  • Organizing Your Genetic Genealogy by Diahan Southard. November 11.
  • Bringing it All Together and Leaving a Permanent Record by Tom Kemp. November 13.
  • Mapping Madness by Ron Arons. November 18.
  • Stories in Stone - Cemetery Research by Gail Blankenau. December 2.
  • Thinking about Becoming an Accredited Genealogist? by Apryl Cox and Kelly Summers. December 9.
  • Pointing Fingers at Ancestors' Siblings - Breaking Down Brick Walls with Collateral Research by Marian Pierre-Louis. December 16.

Click here to register. Or click here register for multiple webinars at the same time.

Print the 2015 webinar brochure here.

See you online!


Tuesday Tip - Husband and Wife Toolbars

Welcome to the Legacy Tuesday Tip!

 

TuesdayTip

Tuesday Tips provide brief how-to's to help you learn how to use the Legacy Family Tree Software with new tricks and techniques.

Husband and Wife Toolbars

Did you know that you can customize the Husband and Wife Toolbars?

These are the icons you see below the husband and wife details on the Family View (see icons in red boxes below).

To customize the toolbars:

Go to Design > Toolbars > Husb/Wife Toolbars.  If you have trouble finding it, the design link will be on the top right of your screen as in the image.

The default setting includes all available icons. You can customize the feature by deleting icons that you don't use or use less frequently.

  HusbandWifeToolbars

Find tech tips every day in the Facebook Legacy User Group. The group is free and is available to anyone with a Facebook account.

For video tech tips checkout the Legacy Quick Tips page.  These short videos will make it easy for you to learn all sort of fun and interesting ways to look at your genealogy research.

 

Michele Simmons Lewis is part of the technical support team at Millennia, the makers of the Legacy Family Tree software program. With over 20 years of research experience, Michele’s passion is helping new genealogists get started on the right foot through her writings, classes and lectures. She is the former staff genealogist and weekly columnist for the McDuffie Mirror and now authors Ancestoring, a blog geared toward the beginner/intermediate researcher. 


Register for Webinar Wednesday - German Names and Naming Patterns by James M. Beidler

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The naming patterns and quirks that are found in German names range from needing to "look in the middle" for first names ... as well as dealing with families who used the identical name for surviving children. This webinar, by James M. Beidler, author of The Family Tree German Genealogy Book, demystifies these and other potential problems.

Join us and James M. Beidler for the live webinar Wednesday, August 26, 2015 at 2pm Eastern U.S. Register today to reserve your virtual seat. Registration is free but space is limited to the first 1,000 people to join that day. Before joining, please visit www.java.com to ensure you have the latest version of Java which our webinar software requires. When you join, if you receive a message that the webinar is full, you know we've reached the 1,000 limit, so we invite you to view the recording which should be published to the webinar archives within an hour or two of the event's conclusion.

Registerbut

Or register for multiple webinars at once by clicking here.

Not sure if you already registered?

On the Upcoming Webinars tab, login to view the webinars you are already signed up for (available for annual or monthly webinar subscribers).

Test Your Webinar Connection

To ensure that your webinar connection is ready to go, click here.

Can't make it to the live event?

No worries. Its recording will be available for a limited time. Webinar Subscribers have unlimited access to all webinar recordings for the duration of their membership.

About the presenter

JamesBeidler-144x144

James M. Beidler is the author of The Family Tree German Genealogy Book as well as writes Roots & Branches, an award-winning weekly newspaper column on genealogy that is the only syndicated feature on that topic in Pennsylvania. He is also a columnist forGerman Life magazine and is editor of Der Kurier, the quarterly journal of the Mid-Atlantic Germanic Society.

 
He was the President of the International Society of Family History Writers and Editorsfrom 2010 to 2012, and is the former Executive Director for the Genealogical Society of Pennsylvania. He served as national co-chairman for the 2008 Federation of Genealogical Societies conference in Philadelphia.
 
Beidler is also frequent contributor to other periodicals ranging from scholarly journals such as The Pennsylvania Genealogical Magazine to popular-interest magazines such asAncestry Magazine and Family Tree Magazine. He also wrote the chapter on genealogy forPennsylvania: A History of the Commonwealth, published jointly by the Penn State Pressand the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission.
 
As a lecturer, he was a part of the Pennsylvania Humanities Council’s acclaimed Commonwealth Speakers program from 2002 to 2009, and has been a presenter at numerous conferences. In addition to being a member of numerous genealogical, historical, and lineage societies, Beidler also sits on Pennsylvania’s State Historic Records Advisory Board as well as the selection committee for the Pennsylvania Digital Newspaper Project.
 
He is a Senior Tax Advisor for an H&R Block franchise and previously was a copy editor for 15 years for The Patriot-News newspaper in Harrisburg, PA.
 
Beidler was born in Reading, PA, and raised in nearby Berks County, where he currently resides and is an eighth-generation member of Bern Reformed United Church of Christ. He graduated Phi Beta Kappa from Hofstra University in Long Island, NY, with a BA in Political Science in 1982.

View Jim's other webinars here.

Add it to your Google Calendar

With our Google Calendar button, you will never forget our upcoming webinars. Simply click the button to add it to your calendar. You can then optionally embed the webinar events (and even turn them on and off) into your own personal calendar. If you have already added the calendar, you do not have to do it again - the new webinar events will automatically appear.

Webinar time

The webinar will be live on Wednesday, August 26, 2015 at:

  • 2pm Eastern (U.S.)
  • 1pm Central
  • 12pm Mountain
  • 11am Pacific

Or use this Time Zone Converter.

Here's how to attend:

  1. Register at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com today. It's free!
  2. You will receive a confirmation email containing a link to the webinar.
  3. You will receive a reminder email both 1 day and 1 hour prior to the live webinar.
  4. Calculate your time zone by clicking here.
  5. Make sure you have the latest version of Java installed on your computer. Check at www.java.com.
  6. Check your GoToWebinar connection here.
  7. Click on the webinar link (found in confirmation and reminder emails) prior to the start of the webinar. Arrive early as the room size is limited to the first 1,000 arrivals that day.
  8. Listen via headset (USB headsets work best), your computer speakers, or by phone.

We look forward to seeing you all there!


What is Your Family Reunion Like?

This past weekend I attended a family reunion. The funny thing is - we don't call it a family reunion. We might call it a family gathering. In essence, though, for me it absolutely is a family reunion. The ever decreasing older generations of my father's side of the family gather for a wonderful weekend each year in an idyllic New England coastal town. There are twenty of us at most.

The weekend is full of trips to the beach, kayaking, watching sunsets and then it climaxes with an all-family BBQ on the deck. Perhaps it's not your typical idea of a family reunion but for us it provides time for catching up and strengthening ties. However, there is little talk of genealogy or the people who came before us.

Kayaking
The Pierre-Louis boys kayaking with their uncle.


My mother's side of the family has a completely different type of reunion. They gather inland on a farm in the Amish country an hour north of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania once every four years. All the descendants for my grandparents generation (my grandfather and his two siblings) attend and over the years it has grown to include distant cousins by marriage. All told there are probably 40-50+ people attending from all generations.

We spend the weekend entirely on the farm except for sleeping in our hotel rooms. Activities include archery, shooting, soccer and hay rides. But similar to my Dad's family there is much talking, laughter and catching up. This side of the family is much more inclined, however, to talk about the ancestors. You'll even find people pulling out documents, old photos and sharing information.

The New England reunion takes me an hour to drive to and planning only a week in advance.  The Pittsburgh reunion involves a 10 hour drive and booking hotel rooms almost a year in advance. They both have their differences but each add to my sense of who I am and where I came from

Geoff Rasmussen recently attended his 3-generational family reunion near Mount Hood in Oregon. He describes his family reunion this way:

"My favorite part of our reunion at Mt. Hood was the impromptu discussion and viewing of our family's pictures. I plugged my laptop into the TV to show everyone the family pictures we had just taken that day. Then one of my brothers asked to see pictures of our family when we will young. In seconds, I was able to display all of our family's group pictures from birth to the present. Because I had previously tagged all of my digital pictures in Photoshop Elements, it filtered through the 20+ thousand pictures, displayed only those with all 8 of us in the picture, and we had a wonderful trip down memory lane. The grandkids had a blast seeing what their parents, aunts, and uncles looked like."

Genealogist True Lewis' family reunion is probably a little different than most.  She attends a really large family reunion every other year. This year there were over 260 people in attendance.

Her family reunion comprises the descendants of great grandfather Ike Ivery, his 3 wives and 23 children. They hold the reunion every two years, which started in 1975, switching between the North and South. They are so organized they already have locations for future reunions - Orlando in 2017 and New Jersey in 2019. To get organized they maintain a Facebook page.

TrueLewisFamilyReunion
Photo courtesy of True A. Lewis


As genealogists we tend to focus on the dead rather than the living. Family reunions are an important way to strengthen ties among living family members no matter what type of reunion you have.  It could be as small as five people or as large as hundreds or even thousands. Whatever the size of your family try to schedule time together. Family reunions allow you to strengthen the idea that family history is an important family value. And that will help you ensure that all the research you've done will be passed down to the next generation.

Did you have a family reunion this year? What was it like? How far did you travel? And what was the highlight for you?

 
Marian Pierre-Louis is the Social Media Marketing Manager for Legacy Family Tree. She is also the host of The Genealogy Professional podcast. Check out her webinars in the Legacy library.

 


Digital Family Reunions - free webinar by Devin Ashby now online

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The recording of today's webinar, "Digital Family Reunions" by Devin Ashby PLUS the after-webinar party is now available to view for free at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com.

Devin will teach you about:

  • Using Skype, GoToMeeting, and Google Hangouts to help families get together online and interact with each other
  • Other ideas such as photo albums, Facebook groups, and suggestions from the live audience

View the Recording at FamilyTreeWebinars.com

If you could not make it to the live event or just want to watch it again, the 1 hour 36 minute recording of "Digital Family Reunions" PLUS the after-webinar party is now available to view in our webinar library for free for a limited time. Or watch it at your convenience with an annual or monthly webinar membership.

Coupon code

Use webinar coupon code - reunion - for 10% off anything at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com or www.LegacyFamilyTreeStore.com, valid through Tuesday, August 25, 2015.

Webinar Memberships/Subscriptions

Webinar Members get:

  • On-demand access to the entire webinar archives (now 256 classes, 384 hours of genealogy education)
  • On-demand access to the instructor handouts (now 1,144 pages)
  • On-demand access to the live webinars' chat logs
  • 5% off all products at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com (must be logged in at checkout)
  • Access to all future recordings for the duration of their membership
  • Chance for a members-only door prize during each live webinar
  • Access to register for bonus members-only webinars
  • Ability to view which webinars you are registered for

Introductory pricing:

  • Annual membership: $49.95/year (that's about the cost of 5 webinar CDs)
  • Monthly membership: $9.95/month

Click here to subscribe.

Register for our upcoming webinars (free)

  • German Names and Naming Patterns by Jim Beidler. August 26.
  • Break Down Brick Walls in Eastern European Research - Tips, Tools and Tricks by Lisa Alzo. September 2.
  • Research Your Swedish Ancestors in Living Color Using ArkivDigital Online by Kathy Meade. September 9.
  • Technology and Techniques for Differentiating Two People with the Same Name by Geoff Rasmussen. September 11.
  • Researching Your Dutch Ancestors by Yvette Hoitink. September 16.
  • Researching Your Ancestors in England and Wales by Kirsty Gray. September 23.
  • Maps Tell Some of the Story for the African-Ancestored Genealogist by Angela Walton-Raji. September 25.
  • Using Periodicals to Find Your Ancestors by Gena Philibert-Ortega. September 30.
  • Wearables and Genealogy - Wacky and Wild or Worth the Wait by Thomas MacEntee. October 7.
  • Colonial Immigration - The English Pioneers of Early America by Beth Foulk. October 14.
  • Billions of Records, Billions of Stories by Devin Ashby. October 16.
  • What Happened to the State of Frankland - Using Tennessee's Pre-Statehood Records by Mark Lowe. October 21.
  • Complex Evidence - What is It? How Does it Work? And Why Does it Matter? by Warren Bittner. October 28.
  • Researching with Karen! by Karen Clifford. November 4.
  • Organizing Your Genetic Genealogy by Diahan Southard. November 11.
  • Bringing it All Together and Leaving a Permanent Record by Tom Kemp. November 13.
  • Mapping Madness by Ron Arons. November 18.
  • Stories in Stone - Cemetery Research by Gail Blankenau. December 2.
  • Thinking about Becoming an Accredited Genealogist? by Apryl Cox and Kelly Summers. December 9.
  • Pointing Fingers at Ancestors' Siblings - Breaking Down Brick Walls with Collateral Research by Marian Pierre-Louis. December 16.

Click here to register. Or click here register for multiple webinars at the same time.

Print the 2015 webinar brochure here.

See you online!


FamilySearch Records Update: New Records for Colombia, France, Peru, Philippines, and United States

Fun FamilySearch additions to the Colombia, FrancePeru, and Philippines international collections this week including significant digital images for Colombia Catholic Church Records from 1600 to 2012. Significant additions were also made to the Texas and Wisconsin marriage collections.  Over 7 million searchable records have been added this week. Follow the links below to explore the new content!

COLLECTION

INDEXED RECORDS

DIGITAL RECORDS

COMMENTS

Colombia Catholic Church Records 1600-2012

0

1,002,173

Added images to an existing collection

France Finistère Quimper et Léon Diocese Catholic Parish Records 1772-1863

144,443

0

Added indexed records to an existing collection

Illinois Adams County Card Index to Deaths 1877-1990

95,523

96,875

Added indexed records and images collection

Peru Lima Civil Registration 1874-1996

862,440

304

Added indexed records and images to an existing collection

Philippines Manila Civil Registration 1899-1984

0

4,088,394

Added images to an existing collection

Philippines Pangasinan Civil Registration 1945-1981

84,935

0

Added indexed records to an existing collection

Texas County Marriage Records 1837-1977

586,960

0

Added indexed records to an existing collection

United States Census 1890

15

0

Added indexed records to an existing collection

United States Obituaries American Historical Society of Germans from Russia 1899-2012

0

4,154

Added images to an existing collection

Wisconsin County Marriages 1836-1911

213,905

0

Added indexed records to an existing collection

Help Us Publish More Free Records Online

Searchable historical records are made available on FamilySearch.org through the help of thousands of online volunteers worldwide. These volunteers transcribe (or index) information from digital copies of handwritten records to make them easily searchable online. More volunteers are always needed (particularly those who can read foreign languages) to keep pace with the large number of digital images being published weekly online on FamilySearch.org. Learn how you can volunteer to help provide free access to the world’s historical genealogical records online at FamilySearch.org/Indexing.
 
About FamilySearch International
FamilySearch is the largest genealogy organization in the world. FamilySearch is a nonprofit, volunteer-driven organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch and its predecessors have been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. Patrons may access FamilySearch services and resources for free at FamilySearch.org or through more than 4,600 family history centers in 132 countries, including the main Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.