Circles or Triangles? What Shape is Your DNA? Free webinar by Diahan Southard now online for limited time

2016-06-29-image500blog

The recording of today's webinar, "Circles or Triangles? What Shape is Your DNA?" by Diahan Southard, is now available to view for free for a limited time at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com. 

Webinar Description

As we march forward into another year of genetic genealogy much is being discovered about the ways in which we can analyze our autosomal DNA data. There is a hot debate over two seemingly competing ideas: the DNA Circle, or the Triangulation method. The DNA Circle was pioneered by AncestryDNA and relies on small shared segments and complete family trees. The Triangulation method requires a chromosome browser and detailed calculations of shared amounts of DNA. We will cover questions like, Which is the best route to take? Do I need a chromosome browser? How can I use these methods in my own genealogy? Autosomal DNA is an ever changing field, this lecture will cover the latest methods of analysis and interpretation for the non-scientist genetic genealogist.

View the Recording at FamilyTreeWebinars.com

If you could not make it to the live event or just want to watch it again, the 1 hour 42 minute recording of "Circles or Triangles? What Shape is Your DNA?" PLUS the after-webinar party is now available to view in our webinar library for free for a limited time. Or watch it at your convenience with an annual or monthly webinar membership.

Coupon code

Use webinar coupon code - dnacircle - for 10% off anything at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com or www.LegacyFamilyTreeStore.com, valid through Monday, July 4, 2016

Dna7packDNA Reference Guide 7-Pack PDF Bundle - 29.95

All seven DNA Reference Guides!
  • Getting Started: Genetics for the Genealogist
  • Y Chromosome DNA for the Genealogist
  • Mitochondrial DNA for the Genealogist
  • Autosomal DNA for the Genealogist
  • Understanding AncestryDNA
  • Understanding Family Tree DNA
  • Understanding 23andMe 

Webinar Memberships/Subscriptions

Webinar Members get:

  • On-demand access to the entire webinar archives (now 364 classes, 526 hours of genealogy education)
  • On-demand access to the instructor handouts (now 1,624 pages)
  • On-demand access to the live webinars' chat logs
  • 5% off all products at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com (must be logged in at checkout)
  • Access to all future recordings for the duration of their membership
  • Chance for a members-only door prize during each live webinar
  • Access to register for bonus members-only webinars
  • Ability to view which webinars you are registered for
  • Use of the playlist, resume watching, and jump-to features

Introductory pricing:

  • Annual membership: $49.95/year
  • Monthly membership: $9.95/month

Click here to subscribe.

Register for our upcoming webinars (free)

  • Navigating Naturalization Records by Lisa Alzo. July 6.
  • Watch Geoff Live: GEDmatch.com. July 8.
  • A Genealogist's Guide to Heraldry by Shannon Combs-Bennett. July 13.
  • Finding French Ancestors by Luana Darby. July 15.
  • Organize Your Online Life by Lisa Louise Cooke. July 20.
  • Researching Women - Community Cookbooks and What They Tell Us About Our Ancestors by Gena Philibert-Ortega. July 27.
  • The Germanic French - Researching Alsatian and Lorrainian Families by John Philip Colletta. July 30.
  • Solutions for Missing and Scarce Records by Tom Jones. July 30.
  • Getting Started with Microsoft PowerPoint by Thomas MacEntee. August 3.
  • The Battle for Bounty Land - War of 1812 and Mexican-American Wars by Beth Foulk. August 10.
  • Homestead Act of 1862 - Following the Witnesses by Bernice Bennett. August 12.
  • Successfully Applying to a Lineage Society by Amy Johnson Crow. August 17.
  • Using Findmypast to Unlock Your Irish Ancestry by Brian Donovan. August 24.
  • The Treasure Trove in Legislative Petitions by Judy Russell. September 14.
  • Clooz - A Document-Based Software Companion by Richard Thomas. September 16.
  • How to Use FamilySearch.org for Beginners by Devin Ashby. September 21.
  • Beginning Polish Genealogy by Lisa Alzo and Jonathan Shea. September 28.
  • AHA! Analysis of Handwriting for Genealogical Research by Ron Arons. October 5.
  • Time and Place - Using Genealogy's Cross-Hairs by Jim Beidler. October 12.
  • Finding Your Ancestors' German Hometown by Ursula Krause. October 14.
  • Social History Websites That Bring Your Ancestor's Story to Life by Gena Philibert-Ortega. October 19.
  • Flip for Flickr - Share, Store and Save Your Family Photos by Maureen Taylor. October 26.
  • Analysis and Correlation - Two Keys to Sound Conclusions by Chris Staats. November 2.
  • Publishing a Genealogy E-Book by Thomas MacEntee. November 9.
  • Dating Family Photographs by Jane Neff Rollins. November 16.
  • Nature & Nurture - Family History for Adoptees by Janet Hovorka and Amy Slade. November 18.
  • Multi-Media Story Telling by Devin Ashby. November 30.
  • Becoming a Genealogy Detective by Sharon Atkins. December 7.
  • From the Heartland - Utilizing Online Resources in Midwest Research by Luana Darby. December 14.
  • Tracing Your European Ancestors by Julie Goucher. December 16.
  • An Introduction to BillionGraves by Garth Fitzner. December 21.

Click here to register.

Print the 2016 webinar brochure here.

See you online!


The 2016 Webinar Subscriber Summer Spectacular!

Get ready for the 2016 Webinar Subscriber Summer Spectacular!

SubscriberSpectacular-image

It's our way of saying thank you to our webinar subscribers!

This summer we will not only have new members-only content, we will also have full in-depth series to help you take your genealogy to a new level.

We'll be sharing with you five new members-only series, released every two weeks, throughout the summer of 2016.

Here's an overview of what you can expect:

Speaker

Series

Release Date

Melissa Barker

Researching in Archives (5 classes)

July 4th

John Grenham

Foundations of Irish Genealogy (6 classes)

July 18th

Thomas MacEntee

Getting Started with Microsoft PowerPoint (10 classes)

August 3rd

Blaine Bettinger

Foundations in DNA (5 classes)

August 15th

Gena Philibert-Ortega

Researching in California (4 classes)

August 29th

Researching in Archives (5 classes)

Archivist Melissa Barker is taking her professional expertise in the Houston County, Tennessee Archives and helping genealogists everywhere find hidden resources in archives, libraries and societies. 

Melissa's 5 classes include:

  • It's Not all Online - Tips from an Archivist
  • Vertical Files - What are they and How to use them
  • Researching in Libraries and Archives
  • Scrapbooks - A Genealogist's Gold Mine
  • Preserving Old Family Letters - Tips from an Archivist

Available to subscribers: July 4, 2016

Foundations of Irish Genealogy (6 classes)

Ireland's best-known genealogist, John Grenham, brings us the most comprehensive introduction to Irish research available online. John is the author of the genealogical standard Tracing Your Irish Ancestors. John gets you started with your Irish research in an approachable way that will take the mystery out of researching your Irish ancestors.

John's 6 classes include:

  • Foundations of Irish Genealogy 1: The Raw Materials of Irish Genealogy
  • Foundations of Irish Genealogy 2: The Major Records I - General Register Office
  • Foundations of Irish Genealogy 3: The Major Record II - Censuses
  • Foundations of Irish Genealogy 4: The Major Record III - Church Records
  • Foundations of Irish Genealogy 5: The Major Record - 19th Century Property Records
  • Foundations of Irish Genealogy 6: Bringing the Major Records Together

Available to subscribers: July 18, 2016

Getting Started with Microsoft PowerPoint

If you enjoyed Thomas MacEntee's Microsoft Word series, you will love his new PowerPoint series. Thomas will take you through the steps of learning to use and make use of PowerPoint the right way. After you take this series of 10 classes, PowerPoint will make sense and you will be comfortable using it.

Thomas' 11 classes include:

  • Microsoft PowerPoint - Getting Started with Microsoft PowerPoint (1 hour) - LIVE - August 3, 2016
  • Microsoft PowerPoint - Slide Formatting and Design (1 hour)
  • Microsoft PowerPoint - Slide Animations, Transitions and Effects (1 hour)
  • Microsoft PowerPoint - Using Photos and Videos (30 minutes)
  • Microsoft PowerPoint - Using Views (30 minutes)
  • Microsoft PowerPoint - Using Drawing and Graphics (30 minutes)
  • Microsoft PowerPoint - Using the Grid and Grouping Items (30 minutes)
  • Microsoft PowerPoint - Using Slide Shows (1 hour)
  • Microsoft PowerPoint - Using the Slide Master (30 minutes) 
  • Microsoft PowerPoint - Settings and Menus (30 minutes)
  • Microsoft PowerPoint - Tips and Tricks (30 minutes)

Available to subscribers: August 3, 2016

Foundations in DNA (5 classes)

DNA is a hot topic in genealogy right now but it can be a bit confusing to learn how it works. Unfamiliar with DNA? Not a problem! DNA expert Blaine Bettinger starts from the very beginning and helps give you an understanding of DNA so that you can apply it as a tool to your genealogy research. 

Blaine's 5 classes include:

  • Foundations in DNA 1: Genealogy and DNA
  • Foundations in DNA 2: DNA Overview
  • Foundations in DNA 3: Y-DNA
  • Foundations in DNA 4: Mitochondrial DNA
  • Foundations in DNA 5: Autosomal DNA 

Available to subscribers: August 15, 2016

Researching in California (4 classes)

Did your ancestors Go West? Learn how to research your California ancestors with California native, Gena Philibert-Ortega. You'll tackle the major record groups and be on your way to uncovering details about your ancestors' California lives!

Gena's 4 classes include:

  • Researching in California (available now)
  • Life and Death in California (available now)
  • Ho for California - Land and Maps
  • Counting California - Censuses, Directories, and Voter Records

Available to subscribers: August 29, 2016

Not a member yet?

You still have time to sign up before the Subscriber Summer Spectacular starts!

In addition to the new summer series, you'll have access to all 363 classes in the Legacy Webinar Library including all the handouts!

Legacy Family Tree Webinars provides genealogy education where-you-are through live and recorded online webinars and videos. Learn from the best instructors in genealogy including Thomas MacEntee, Judy Russell, J. Mark Lowe, Lisa Louise Cooke, Megan Smolenyak, Tom Jones, and many more. Learn at your convenience. On-demand classes are available 24 hours a day! All you need is a computer or mobile device with an Internet connection.

Subscribe today and get access to this BONUS members-only webinar AND all of this:

  • All 363 classes in the library (524 hours of quality genealogy education)
  • 1,624 pages of instructors' handouts
  • Chat logs from the live webinars
  • Additional 5% off anything at FamilyTreeWebinars.com
  • Chance for a bonus subscribers-only door prize during each live webinar
  • Additional members-only webinars

It's just $49.95/year or $9.95/month.

Subscribe


Tuesday's Tip - Highlighting Multiple Locations

  TT - Highlighting Multiple Locations


Tuesday's Tips provide brief how-to's to help you learn to use the Legacy Family Tree software with new tricks and techniques.

Highlighting Multiple Locations

One of the beta testers posted on this recently in response to a question someone asked. I thought this would make a good tip of the day.

Let's say you want to make a list of everyone that uses Lamar County, Mississippi. I am going to sort the Location List by state then county then town so that all the Lamar County locations sort together. I can then highlight all of the locations using the Windows command CTRL (hold the button down) and then select the locations using the mouse.

Over on the right only the people using the LAST location will show up in the box and this is where people get a bit confused. To see ALL of the people for ALL of the highlighted locations you need to go to OPTIONS > SHOW LIST.

You can now Tag Everyone in List or you can Create Search List.

 

MultipleLocations

 

Find tech tips every day in the Facebook Legacy User Group. The group is free and is available to anyone with a Facebook account.

For video tech tips checkout the Legacy Quick Tips page.  These short videos will make it easy for you to learn all sort of fun and interesting ways to look at your genealogy research.

Michele Simmons Lewis is part of the technical support team at Millennia, the makers of the Legacy Family Tree software program. With over 20 years of research experience, Michele’s passion is helping new genealogists get started on the right foot through her writings, classes and lectures. She is the former staff genealogist and weekly columnist for the McDuffie Mirror and now authors Ancestoring, a blog geared toward the beginner/intermediate researcher.

 


New - Register for Watch Geoff Live: GEDmatch.com

6a00d8341d219b53ef01bb08d43cd3970d-500wi

After the incredible findings of my first encounter with genetic genealogy, I am ready to take my DNA research to the next level. I want YOU – the live webinar audience – to be there with me as I explore GEDmatch.com for the first time.

Since our Watch Geoff Live: DNA webinar in April, which some are saying was "the best overall DNA presentation [they've] ever caught..." I've tested the DNA of my father, his father, and my father-in-law. This really is the next big thing in genealogy! As has been suggested as the next logical step with genetic genealogy research, I've imported the data into GEDmatch.com, but am very unsure on how to interpret what it has found.

Once again, I've invited DNA expert, webinar presenter, and yourDNAguide.com's Diahan Southard to be on hand to guide, interpret and explain the findings. The result will be a live and unscripted session giving DNA neophyte researchers (like me) a first-hand look at what to expect from one of DNA’s key tools – GEDmatch.com. I'd love to share the experience with all of you (Friday, July 8, 2016) so please register for the live webinar here.

6a00d8341d219b53ef01b7c82fa2df970b-500wi


Register for Webinar Wednesday - Circles or Triangles? What Shape is Your DNA? by Diahan Southard

Register

As we march forward into another year of genetic genealogy much is being discovered about the ways in which we can analyze our autosomal DNA data. There is a hot debate over two seemingly competing ideas: the DNA Circle, or the Triangulation method. The DNA Circle was pioneered by AncestryDNA and relies on small shared segments and complete family trees. The Triangulation method requires a chromosome browser and detailed calculations of shared amounts of DNA. We will cover questions like, Which is the best route to take? Do I need a chromosome browser? How can I use these methods in my own genealogy? Autosomal DNA is an ever changing field, this lecture will cover the latest methods of analysis and interpretation for the non-scientist genetic genealogist.

Logotransparent

Join us and Diahan Southard,  for the live webinar Wednesday, June 29, 2016 at 2pm Eastern U.S. Register today to reserve your virtual seat. Registration is free but space is limited to the first 1,000 people to join that day. Before joining, please visit www.java.com to ensure you have the latest version of Java which our webinar software requires. When you join, if you receive a message that the webinar is full, you know we've reached the 1,000 limit, so we invite you to view the recording which should be published to the webinar archives within an hour or two of the event's conclusion.

Download the syllabus

In preparation for the webinar, download the supplemental syllabus materials here. The syllabus is available for annual or monthly webinar subscribers. Log in here or subscribe here.

Registerbut 

Or register for multiple webinars at once by clicking here.

Not sure if you already registered?

Login to view your registration status for this webinar (available for annual or monthly webinar subscribers).

Test Your Webinar Connection

To ensure that your webinar connection is ready to go, click here.

Can't make it to the live event?

No worries. Its recording will be available for a limited time. Webinar Subscribers have unlimited access to all webinar recordings for the duration of their membership.

About the presenter

DiahanSouthard-144x144A microbiology graduate, Diahan Southard worked before and after graduation for the Sorenson Molecular Genealogy Foundation. Growing up with the budding genetic genealogy industry lead her to her current position as Your DNA Guide, where she provides personalized, interactive experiences to assist individuals and families in interpreting their genetic results in the context of their genealogical information. Diahan's lectures are always fun, upbeat, and full of energy. She has a passion for genetic genealogy, a genuine love for people, and a gift for making the technical understandable.

Add it to your Google Calendar

With our Google Calendar button, you will never forget our upcoming webinars. Simply click the button to add it to your calendar. You can then optionally embed the webinar events (and even turn them on and off) into your own personal calendar. If you have already added the calendar, you do not have to do it again - the new webinar events will automatically appear.

Webinar time

The webinar will be live on Wednesday, June 29, 2016 at:

  • 2pm Eastern (U.S.)
  • 1pm Central
  • 12pm Mountain
  • 11am Pacific

Or use this Time Zone Converter.

Here's how to attend:

  1. Register at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com today. It's free!
  2. You will receive a confirmation email containing a link to the webinar.
  3. You will receive a reminder email both 1 day and 1 hour prior to the live webinar.
  4. Calculate your time zone by clicking here.
  5. Make sure you have the latest version of Java installed on your computer. Check at www.java.com.
  6. Check your GoToWebinar connection here.
  7. Click on the webinar link (found in confirmation and reminder emails) prior to the start of the webinar. Arrive early as the room size is limited to the first 1,000 arrivals that day.
  8. Listen via headset (USB headsets work best), your computer speakers, or by phone.

We look forward to seeing you all there!


Using Keywords in Genealogical Research

Using Keywords 2

 

In my last blog post, I explained the benefits of creating a keyword list as a tool to help you organize your research. This however begs the question - How does using keywords lead to research success in genealogy? Using keywords can help researchers follow the paper trail and build the context around their ancestor’s life story. For continuity’s sake, I am sticking with the example that I used in the last post: the newspaper article about Capt. Bensley Collenette of Boston, Massachusetts.

How do keywords lead you down the paper trail?

I think of keywords as mental triggers. With experience follows greater intuition and the ability to point out that certain facts or keywords indicate there is more of a paper trail to follow. As an isolated example, this newspaper article provides several leads for more records. Capt. Collenette was noted to be a naturalized citizen of Boston, which suggests that his naturalization petition could be obtained and provide more genealogical information. In fact, in retrieving Captain Collenette’s petition for naturalization, the source offers a correction to the information in the newspaper article. Rather than being born in Germany, he was born on the Island of Guernsey, located in the English Channel.[1] In the final sentence of the article, the writer noted the Captain ran a navigation school in Boston. When an ancestor is identified as operating a place of business, the city directories are a great source for finding more about the history surrounding a particular business or institution.

Capt. Collenette’s qualifications for navigating and piloting ships offer clues to extending the paper trail. The article states that Captain Collenette was qualified as a master mariner in both England and the United States. The National Maritime Museum in Greenwich, England has custody of certificates for qualified Masters and Mates in the United Kingdom, but digitized copies are searchable on Ancestry.com. Masters of vessels in the United States required an official endorsement from the ship’s owner if a new master were to pilot that vessel. The ledger books containing endorsement of masters are held by the National Archives and Records Administration. I did locate Capt. Collenette among these records as the master of the steam yacht Myopia, allowing me to add one more kernel of information to the history of his seafaring life.[2]

Using Keywords in Genealogical Research
 

Using Keywords in Search Engines

For terms that are unfamiliar, you should start by trying all of these terms in a Google search. This is a good strategy for two reasons:

  • You can mine the vast resources of the Internet, allowing you to locate some sources quickly.
  • You can measure and analyze the appearance of a keyword.

The article mentions various ships that Capt. Collenette served on, so using Google, I searched for these different ships. I was able to locate some history about these vessels, as well as some pictures. Using keywords in Google however takes some practice and playing around with the different terms. For example, in searching the names of vessels, you often have to precede the name with the type of vessel. Google is the type of search engine that works best when you communicate exactly what you’re looking for. Webinars by Lisa Louise Cooke and Thomas MacEntee offer great advice on how to use Google and other search engines for genealogy.

 

Steam yacht lurline
Steam Yacht Lurline. Image Source: Library of Congress.

 

Don’t overlook the search results in Google Books and Google Scholar. I found this method particularly helpful when I was looking up the occupation of steamboat inspector. Google had digitized copies of Annual Reports of Supervising Inspector General, Steamboat Inspection Service. [3] While no mention of Capt. Collenette was made among these publications, I was able to learn a lot more concerning the nature and specific qualifications for the position.

If there are famous people, noted officials or institutions mentioned in a particular source, extend your keyword search using catalogs like ArchiveGrid and Periodical Source Index. Using keyword searches in catalogs, I was able to locate papers for local steamboat inspector Andrew D. Burnham, U.S. Inspector General George Starbuck, and Edward Winslow, Collector of Customs for the Port of Boston.

The keyword strategy can result in dead ends sometimes, but offers a methodical and calculated approach to seeking out other sources. When trying this type of research, it might be helpful to follow the trail of keywords mentioned in secondary sources. Sometimes, we are able to gather a lot more details and history if we generalize what we are looking for. A ship name might be too specific or offer only limited information, but if we broaden to a shipping line, like the Royal Mail Steam Packet Company, there are a lot more sources available for research. Analyzing all your sources for repetitions in keywords or subjects can definitely lead to more information.

See what you can find using keywords in your research and let me know what you find!

 

[1] "United States, New England, Petitions for Naturalization, 1787-1906," images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1951-34239-28679-49?cc=2064580 : 22 May 2014), Massachusetts > US Circuit Courts > US Circuit Court > Petitions for naturalization, 1874 Oct, vol 82 > image 357 of 430; citing NARA NAID 4752894, National Archives at Boston, Waltham, Massachusetts.

[2] “Records of Endorsements of Change of Master of Enrolled & Licensed Vessels, 1894-1914,” District of Boston, Massachusetts, Vol. 312, National Archives at Boston.

[3] A more complete collection of these reports is available through the Hathitrust Digital Library.

---

Jake Fletcher is a professional genealogist, educator and blogger. Jake has been researching and writing about his ancestors since 2008 on his research blog. He currently volunteers as a research assistant at the National Archives in Waltham, Massachusetts and is Vice President of the New England Association of Professional Genealogists (NEAPG).


Digging Deeper in German Parish Records - free webinar by Gail Blankenau now online for limited time

2016-06-22-image500blog

The recording of today's webinar, "Digging Deeper in German Parish Records" by Gail Blankenau, is now available to view for free for a limited time at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com. 

Webinar Description

Continue your work in Germanic parish records, with examples and cases that will help you with an array of strategies and situations to help you learn how to bridge the gaps and build your Germanic lineage.

View the Recording at FamilyTreeWebinars.com

If you could not make it to the live event or just want to watch it again, the 1 hour 46 minute recording of "Digging Deeper in German Parish Records" PLUS the after-webinar party is now available to view in our webinar library for free for a limited time. Or watch it at your convenience with an annual or monthly webinar membership.

Coupon code

Use webinar coupon code - digging - for 10% off anything at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com or www.LegacyFamilyTreeStore.com, valid through Monday, June 27, 2016

Deciphering Germainc ScriptLegacy QuickGuide: Deciphering Germanic Script: Common Words in Church Books - 2.95

Church books are the “heart and soul of German genealogy.” Learning to read them is an important step in your research. Because Germany was not a unified country until 1871, there are many dialect words in these records. The longer you work in your particular parish, the more familiar you will become with your area’s usage.
 
The Deciphering Germanic Script: Common Words in Church Books Legacy QuickGuide™ contains handwriting examples for some of the common words found in German records. This handy 5-page PDF guide can be used on your computer or mobile device for anytime access.
 

Webinar Memberships/Subscriptions

Webinar Members get:

  • On-demand access to the entire webinar archives (now 363 classes, 523 hours of genealogy education)
  • On-demand access to the instructor handouts (now 1,607 pages)
  • On-demand access to the live webinars' chat logs
  • 5% off all products at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com (must be logged in at checkout)
  • Access to all future recordings for the duration of their membership
  • Chance for a members-only door prize during each live webinar
  • Access to register for bonus members-only webinars
  • Ability to view which webinars you are registered for
  • Use of the playlist, resume watching, and jump-to features

Introductory pricing:

  • Annual membership: $49.95/year
  • Monthly membership: $9.95/month

Click here to subscribe.

Register for our upcoming webinars (free)

  • Circles or Triangles? What Shape is Your DNA? by Diahan Southard. June 29.
  • Navigating Naturalization Records by Lisa Alzo. July 6.
  • A Genealogist's Guide to Heraldry by Shannon Combs-Bennett. July 13.
  • Finding French Ancestors by Luana Darby. July 15.
  • Organize Your Online Life by Lisa Louise Cooke. July 20.
  • Researching Women - Community Cookbooks and What They Tell Us About Our Ancestors by Gena Philibert-Ortega. July 27.
  • The Germanic French - Researching Alsatian and Lorrainian Families by John Philip Colletta. July 30.
  • Solutions for Missing and Scarce Records by Tom Jones. July 30.
  • Getting Started with Microsoft PowerPoint by Thomas MacEntee. August 3.
  • The Battle for Bounty Land - War of 1812 and Mexican-American Wars by Beth Foulk. August 10.
  • Homestead Act of 1862 - Following the Witnesses by Bernice Bennett. August 12.
  • Successfully Applying to a Lineage Society by Amy Johnson Crow. August 17.
  • Using Findmypast to Unlock Your Irish Ancestry by Brian Donovan. August 24.
  • The Treasure Trove in Legislative Petitions by Judy Russell. September 14.
  • Clooz - A Document-Based Software Companion by Richard Thomas. September 16.
  • How to Use FamilySearch.org for Beginners by Devin Ashby. September 21.
  • Beginning Polish Genealogy by Lisa Alzo and Jonathan Shea. September 28.
  • AHA! Analysis of Handwriting for Genealogical Research by Ron Arons. October 5.
  • Time and Place - Using Genealogy's Cross-Hairs by Jim Beidler. October 12.
  • Finding Your Ancestors' German Hometown by Ursula Krause. October 14.
  • Social History Websites That Bring Your Ancestor's Story to Life by Gena Philibert-Ortega. October 19.
  • Flip for Flickr - Share, Store and Save Your Family Photos by Maureen Taylor. October 26.
  • Analysis and Correlation - Two Keys to Sound Conclusions by Chris Staats. November 2.
  • Publishing a Genealogy E-Book by Thomas MacEntee. November 9.
  • Dating Family Photographs by Jane Neff Rollins. November 16.
  • Nature & Nurture - Family History for Adoptees by Janet Hovorka and Amy Slade. November 18.
  • Multi-Media Story Telling by Devin Ashby. November 30.
  • Becoming a Genealogy Detective by Sharon Atkins. December 7.
  • From the Heartland - Utilizing Online Resources in Midwest Research by Luana Darby. December 14.
  • Tracing Your European Ancestors by Julie Goucher. December 16.
  • An Introduction to BillionGraves by Garth Fitzner. December 21.

Click here to register.

Print the 2016 webinar brochure here.

See you online!


Tuesday's Tip - FamilySearch Images

  TT - FamilySearch Images


Tuesday's Tips provide brief how-to's to help you learn to use the Legacy Family Tree software with new tricks and techniques.

FamilySearch Images

By now everyone knows that FamilySearch has a plethora of records online but did you know that there are a lot more records online that you can't readily see? If you just do a search on the Documents page you will miss them. If you do a search in the FHL card catalog you might just luck up and find a record set that has a link to images but since it hasn't yet been pulled into the indexing project you will not seen them in the list of records.

For example, take a look at this -Deeds, 1786-1865; index to deeds, 1786-1913, Greenville County (South Carolina). Register of Mesne Conveyance.

https://familysearch.org/search/catalog/472237?availability=Family%20History%20Library

Scroll down on this page and the microfilms that have cameras next to them are accessible online as images. Click the camera and you will be taken right to the online images of the roll of microfilm.

FamilySearch-cameraicon

 

Index to deeds, 1786-1913, Greenville County (South Carolina). Register of Mesne Conveyance on FamilySearch
Index to deeds, 1786-1913, Greenville County (South Carolina). Register of Mesne Conveyance on FamilySearch

 

Find tech tips every day in the Facebook Legacy User Group. The group is free and is available to anyone with a Facebook account.

For video tech tips checkout the Legacy Quick Tips page.  These short videos will make it easy for you to learn all sort of fun and interesting ways to look at your genealogy research.

Michele Simmons Lewis is part of the technical support team at Millennia, the makers of the Legacy Family Tree software program. With over 20 years of research experience, Michele’s passion is helping new genealogists get started on the right foot through her writings, classes and lectures. She is the former staff genealogist and weekly columnist for the McDuffie Mirror and now authors Ancestoring, a blog geared toward the beginner/intermediate researcher.

 

 


Register for Webinar Wednesday - Digging Deeper in German Parish Records by Gail Blankenau

Register

Continue your work in Germanic parish records, with examples and cases that will help you with an array of strategies and situations to help you learn how to bridge the gaps and build your Germanic lineage.

Logotransparent

Join us and Gail Blankenau,  for the live webinar Wednesday, June 22, 2016 at 2pm Eastern U.S. Register today to reserve your virtual seat. Registration is free but space is limited to the first 1,000 people to join that day. Before joining, please visit www.java.com to ensure you have the latest version of Java which our webinar software requires. When you join, if you receive a message that the webinar is full, you know we've reached the 1,000 limit, so we invite you to view the recording which should be published to the webinar archives within an hour or two of the event's conclusion.

Download the syllabus

In preparation for the webinar, download the supplemental syllabus materials here. The syllabus is available for annual or monthly webinar subscribers. Log in here or subscribe here.

Registerbut 

Or register for multiple webinars at once by clicking here.

Not sure if you already registered?

Login to view your registration status for this webinar (available for annual or monthly webinar subscribers).

Test Your Webinar Connection

To ensure that your webinar connection is ready to go, click here.

Can't make it to the live event?

No worries. Its recording will be available for a limited time. Webinar Subscribers have unlimited access to all webinar recordings for the duration of their membership.

About the presenter

GailBlankenau-144x144Gail Blankenau is an experienced genealogist, speaker and author. Her publications include articles in the New England Historical and Genealogical Register and The Genealogist. She is also a contributor to Family Chronicle and Internet Genealogy magazines. Based in Nebraska, she specializes in Nebraska records, Midwestern roots, German genealogy, land records, 19th-Century photographs and tracing lineages. More than half her ancestors came from New England, but she has roots in almost every state east of the Mississippi.

Add it to your Google Calendar

With our Google Calendar button, you will never forget our upcoming webinars. Simply click the button to add it to your calendar. You can then optionally embed the webinar events (and even turn them on and off) into your own personal calendar. If you have already added the calendar, you do not have to do it again - the new webinar events will automatically appear.

Webinar time

The webinar will be live on Wednesday, June 22, 2016 at:

  • 2pm Eastern (U.S.)
  • 1pm Central
  • 12pm Mountain
  • 11am Pacific

Or use this Time Zone Converter.

Here's how to attend:

  1. Register at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com today. It's free!
  2. You will receive a confirmation email containing a link to the webinar.
  3. You will receive a reminder email both 1 day and 1 hour prior to the live webinar.
  4. Calculate your time zone by clicking here.
  5. Make sure you have the latest version of Java installed on your computer. Check at www.java.com.
  6. Check your GoToWebinar connection here.
  7. Click on the webinar link (found in confirmation and reminder emails) prior to the start of the webinar. Arrive early as the room size is limited to the first 1,000 arrivals that day.
  8. Listen via headset (USB headsets work best), your computer speakers, or by phone.

We look forward to seeing you all there!


Got IMMIGRANT ancestors? New 3-part BONUS immigration webinar series by Lisa Alzo now available

Immigrant

Got immigrant ancestors? We'll help you find them! Announcing a brand new 3-part Immigration Series:

We're working hard to give our webinar subscribers the educational classes they need to maximize their genealogical research! All three of these new classes are bonus webinars in the webinar library. The webinar previews are always free.

New to webinars and online education? Learn more about the online genealogy education classes at Legacy Family Tree Webinars.

Tracing Immigrant Ancestors in New York Passenger Lists

The Port of New York was the largest and perhaps most famous port of arrival for many of our immigrant ancestors. In this webinar, you will learn where to find New York passenger lists, what genealogy information they will provide, and tips and tricks for searching online records in the Ellis Island Database, the Castle Garden and FamilySearch websites, Ancestry.com, and other resources.

1 

_WatchVideo

_WatchPreview

Tracing Immigrant Ancestors: the Other Ports

Can't find your ancestors in New York Passenger Lists? Perhaps your immigrant ancestor arrived at another location. In this webinar learn how to locate and search for passenger lists for Boston, Baltimore, Philadelphia New Orleans, San Francisco, and Galveston, as well as other minor ports.

2

_WatchVideo

_WatchPreview 

Tracing Immigrant Ancestors: Advanced Tips and Techniques

Frustrated by the search for your immigrant ancestor's arrival record? In this webinar, learn some advanced tips and techniques for mining online passenger databases with tools such as Steve Morse's One-Step Web Pages, and how to find clues about an ancestor's immigration in other records such as censuses, port of departure lists, border crossing records, passport applications, newspapers, naturalization petitions, and more.

3

_WatchVideo

_WatchPreview 

Other Immigration Webinars

These new classes join 7 additional webinars on immigration research already in the Webinar Library:

 Not a member yet?

Legacy Family Tree Webinars provides genealogy education where-you-are through live and recorded online webinars and videos. Learn from the best instructors in genealogy including Thomas MacEntee, Judy Russell, J. Mark Lowe, Lisa Louise Cooke, Megan Smolenyak, Tom Jones, and many more. Learn at your convenience. On-demand classes are available 24 hours a day! All you need is a computer or mobile device with an Internet connection.

Subscribe today and get access to this BONUS members-only webinar AND all of this:

  • All 362 classes in the library (519 hours of quality genealogy education)
  • 1,593 pages of instructors' handouts
  • Chat logs from the live webinars
  • Additional 5% off anything at FamilyTreeWebinars.com
  • Chance for a bonus subscribers-only door prize during each live webinar
  • Additional members-only webinars

It's just $49.95/year or $9.95/month.

Subscribe

Look at our lineup of speakers for 2016! All live webinars are free to watch.

2016speakers3

Print the 2016 webinar brochure here.


DNA testing, Legacy, and FindMyPast's hints - why I'm closer to solving my genealogy brick wall

One of the great stories of the year is how DNA testing is solving so many genealogy brick walls. Between DNA and the recent release of the largest online collection of US marriage records at FindMyPast, I'm closer than ever to solving the long-standing brick wall of Asa Clark Brown's two missing children.

Remember this slide? It explains it all.

2016-04-19-dna

In the recent "Watch Geoff Live: DNA" webinar, I discovered that John and Griffin Brown DO share DNA with my grandmother, and that somehow they fit into OUR family. If you missed it, watch the recording here. Some people are saying it was the "best overall DNA presentation I've every caught." It certainly felt that way to me as I learned what I did about my family.

I've long suspected Griffin Brown to be Asa's third child but haven't found enough evidence to be confident about it. Now that DNA has proven that he fits in somewhere, his family is my #1 priority again. Knowing that the answers to our ancestors' questions often lie in the records of their children, grandchildren and beyond, I am now resuming my research on Griffin's family, but with a heavy emphasis on his children.

FindMyPast

In my recent article, "My first look at FindMyPast's new 100 million marriage records" I explained how Legacy Family Tree found 8,301 individuals in my family file who had no place of marriage recorded. I then searched FindMyPast and quickly found a marriage record for one of these individuals. With this finding, I predicted that "my relationship with FindMyPast is going to get a lot closer in these next few months."

After hours of sleeplessness last night, thinking about Griffin Brown's family, a brilliant idea came - in the morning I would export a GEDCOM file of Griffin's family, upload it to a new tree in FindMyPast, and see how FindMyPast's new Hinting tools would perform.

After explaining to my wife that it must have been someone else who was snoring all night, I made my way to the office, opened Legacy, and created the GEDCOM. Here's how:

1. At File > Export > GEDCOM file I clicked on the Record Selection button, clicked on the "Edit Focus Group" button, selected the "Add an Individual and Entire Family Line", selected Griffin Brown, clicked OK, and clicked Close.

2016-06-17_9-52-45

2. I clicked on the "Select File Name..." button in the upper right, gave it a file name, and clicked Save.

The small GEDCOM file was now created. Following the steps below, I uploaded the file to FindMyPast:

1. At FindMyPast.com, click on the Family Tree menu, then click on Import a tree.

2

2. Select the GEDCOM file, and click the Upload button.

Eleven seconds later, the tree was complete.

3

What showed up next was completely unexpected and very exciting! Griffin's family appeared, as expected, but what I did not anticipate was how quickly FindMyPast's Hinting would get to work.

4

Here is a zoomed-in portion of Carl A. Brown, one of Griffin's children. Notice all the orange circles? The numbers represent the number of hints waiting for me. Maybe they appeared so quickly because the GEDCOM file only included 36 individuals, but I was ready for some instant gratification, and I was not disappointed.

5

I first clicked on Carl Brown's orange circle and was shown this screen with the six hints:

6

Since Carl was one of the 8,301 individuals in my Legacy file without a marriage place, I was delighted to see three FindMyPast hints about a possible marriage for him. From prior census research, I estimated his marriage to Gertrude Sturgeon to be about 1896 in Pennsylvania.

The first hint's screen looked like this:

7

The real jewel of this screen is the small View Transcript button in the upper right which brought me to this page, which this time had the full marriage date displayed:

8

Finally, clicking on the View Image button displayed what looked like the first page of his application for a marriage license:

Brown, Carl A and Sturgeon, Gertrude B 1897 marriage record

The next hint led me to a digital copy of the marriage certificate:

Brown, Carl A and Sturgeon, Gertrude B 1897 marriage record page 2

And the last hint led me to one of the most interesting marriage records I've ever seen:

Brown,-Carl-A-and-Sturgeon,-Gertrude-B-1897-marriage-record-page-3

There are lots of goodies in this marriage record including the exact birth dates of both Carl and Gertrude. It also lists Carl's exact place of birth, which matches where Griffin and Griffin's father were from! And then it says this:

...that he has once been married before to his present wife in Camden NJ Feby 1897 now desire to remarry

How cool is that?!? Apparently, this marriage in Philadelphia, which occurred on May 17, 1897, was their SECOND marriage to each other in three months. I bet there's a really interesting story there.

Since there were no other hints for Carl related to marriage records, I went to the main United States Marriages database here and did a manual search for Carl and Gertrude to see if I could pick up their marriage in New Jersey. Look what it found:

10

This time there was no digital image, and it gave their first marriage date as May 6, 1896, not the February date like the other marriage record showed.

11

I then noticed that there was a FamilySearch film number in the record, so I turned to FamilySearch to see if they had anything else.

45

While they had the digital image of the index page, it did not have a copy of the original record. So it'll take a little more effort to obtain the original. 

So...why two marriages? Looking at Google Earth, Camden and Philadelphia were right across the river from each other. Was Camden a "Gretna Green" as webinar speaker Gena Philibert-Ortega often discusses? Did they have a late-night decision and later regret it? I don't know. Maybe I'll get lucky and find a newspaper article or a family story somewhere.

My Conclusions

  1. DNA testing should be mandatory. Test yourself, or the oldest living relatives in your family - today!
  2. FindMyPast's tree hinting brings the research to you! And with their massive US marriage records collection, FindMyPast should be in every US researcher's toolbox. I encourage all Legacy Family Tree users to upload, at the very least, a small GEDCOM file of the portion of the tree they are currently working on, and then check out the new hints. Guess what I'll be doing all weekend?
  3. You never know what you are going to discover. That's why genealogy is so much fun!

What’s In a Name? Challenges We Face With Family or Pet Nicknames

LFT Nicknames colour

 

Names are important in genealogy research. But names can be confusing and can add challenges for the genealogist.

I've written previously about about surnames that were changed, either deliberately or accidentally, over generations in 5 Tips to Help You Navigate the Confusing Maze of Surname Variations. There are other surname variations that genealogists can find confusing and challenging. See Oh Those Dit Names!  and  Dutch Patronymics: Confusing or Helpful?

These surname variations can make research into those families challenging! But genealogical research can also be confusing when our ancestors used nicknames, or alternated between using their first and middle names.

Besides the standard nicknames that we discover as we research our ancestors, what other variant names might we encounter along the path of filling out our family tree?

Standard or Common Nicknames

Some standard nicknames most of us are familiar with are the shortened version of longer names such as Rob for Robert, Cathy for Catherine, Barb for Barbara, Dave for David, etc.

Most of us are also famliar with variations of alternate names that are almost, but not quite, shortened versions. These include such names as Bob for Robert, Jim for James, Maggie for Margaret, Ted for Edward, Bill for William, Cindy for Cynthia etc.

Less Common Nicknames

There are also nicknames that might not be quite so familiar, such as Delia for Bridget, Peggy for Margaret, Chuck for Charles.

Nicknames such as the type I’ve mentioned above can frustrate us if we are not familiar with them, but it is helpful to know that there are online lists of such standard nicknames which we can consult.

Family or Pet Nicknames

What about ancestors with first names that have absolutely nothing to do with the name they were given at birth?! These are people whose commonly used first name is not a derivative or nickname or anything other than some invented or pet name used by family and friends.

You can't assume that just because Grandpa was called Charlie that his actual name was Charles. Grandma might have been called Bobbie by her friends but does that mean her name at birth was Roberta? Not necessarily! Let me give you some actual examples in my family trees.

Examples of Family or Pet Nicknames

Everyone called my husband’s grandfather Charlie. Friends and family alike, even his wife called him Charlie. That was the name on their mailbox and in the local phone book. His driver’s licence was in the name Charlie. So of course we assumed his given name was Charles. But his birth registration found a few years ago showed that his actual name was Leon Thomas. How did he get the nickname Charlie? No one knows and he is no longer alive to tell us. It's a family mystery that will likely never be solved.

To add to the story, Charlie’s wife was called Kak by everyone in the small town where they lived. Family called her Kak but her name was Mary. Her nickname of Kak began when her first born granddaughter couldn’t say “Grandma” but managed a sound that was “Kak”.

My maternal grandmother was Dolly. I assumed that was her given name but she was born Ruth Ethel. When I asked her about the name, Dolly she told me that when she was born she was so tiny that her mother thought she looked like a little doll. That was what her mother began calling her, and the name Dolly stuck with my Grandmother her whole life.

Other examples are my friend Bobbie whose brother could not pronounce her real name of Celia. He called her "baby" which sounded like "Bawby" and thus Bobbie was the name used by family and later her friends. It was many years before I learned her real name.

Then there’s me. My name is Lorine but my grandchildren call me Ollie. I’m sure that will confuse my descendants, especially since some of my grandchildren don’t seem to know what my real name is. How did I get the name Ollie? That came about because of my middle name Olive. My youngest son used to teasingly call me Ollie and that stuck for my grandchildren.

So keep an open mind and don’t jump to the wrong conclusion such as refusing to believe that the genealogy record you found for a man named Achilles is in fact your Belgium great grandfather Archie when all the facts fit!

In this example, my husband and I were researching his great-grandfather Archie born in Tielt, Belgium in 1894. We knew his parents’ names but the only record we could find was for a child named Achilles. Once we had the name Achilles pronounced by a native French speaker, we realized that it sounds like Aw-SHEE, which of course can easly become Archie. And thus my husband’s great grandfather Archie was indeed the man named Achilles baptised in Tielt in 1894.

What are some pet names or family nicknames that you discovered for an elusive ancestor in your family tree?

 

Lorine McGinnis Schulze is a Canadian genealogist who has been involved with genealogy and history for more than thirty years. In 1996 Lorine created the Olive Tree Genealogy website and its companion blog. Lorine is the author of many published genealogical and historical articles and books.

 

 


Ticked Off! Those Pesky Pre-1850 Census Tic Marks - free webinar by Peggy Lauritzen, AG now online for limited time

2016-06-15-image500blog

The recording of today's webinar, "Ticked Off! Those Pesky Pre-1850 Census Tic Marks" by Peggy Clemens Lauritzen, AG, is now available to view for free for a limited time at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com. 

Webinar Description

It’s exciting when we are able to find our ancestors on every census they appeared on, until we reach 1840 and before. Those pesky tic marks seem to get in our way as we work to extend our pedigrees. Just what do they mean, and how can they help me? Are they throwing us into a dead end, or can they tell us more?

View the Recording at FamilyTreeWebinars.com

If you could not make it to the live event or just want to watch it again, the 1 hour 42 minute recording of "Ticked Off! Those Pesky Pre-1850 Census Tic Marks" PLUS the after-webinar party is now available to view in our webinar library for free for a limited time. Or watch it at your convenience with an annual or monthly webinar membership.

Coupon code

Use webinar coupon code - census1850 - for 10% off anything at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com or www.LegacyFamilyTreeStore.com, valid through Monday, June 20, 2016

US Federal Non-PopulationLegacy QuickGuide: U.S. Federal Non-population Census Records - 2.95

The U.S. government took special censuses, commonly referred to as “non-population” schedules, to count unique segments of the population or create snapshots of communities. Although lesser known and under used, these schedules are full of genealogically significant information, and should be utilized for the years and places where available. Not all special census records survived, and many aren’t yet available online—researching them can be challenging, but they are worth the effort.
 
The U.S. Federal Non-population Census Records Legacy QuickGuide™ contains useful information including the different types of non-population schedules, access points for these records, and strategies for using each group of records. Also included are links to websites and resources covering agricultural schedules, mortality schedules, manufacturing schedules, “DDD” schedules and more. This handy 8-page PDF guide can be used on your computer or mobile device for anytime access.
 

Webinar Memberships/Subscriptions

Webinar Members get:

  • On-demand access to the entire webinar archives (now 359 classes, 518 hours of genealogy education)
  • On-demand access to the instructor handouts (now 1,555 pages)
  • On-demand access to the live webinars' chat logs
  • 5% off all products at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com (must be logged in at checkout)
  • Access to all future recordings for the duration of their membership
  • Chance for a members-only door prize during each live webinar
  • Access to register for bonus members-only webinars
  • Ability to view which webinars you are registered for
  • Use of the playlist, resume watching, and jump-to features

Introductory pricing:

  • Annual membership: $49.95/year
  • Monthly membership: $9.95/month

Click here to subscribe.

Register for our upcoming webinars (free)

  • Digging Deeper in German Parish Records by Gail Blankenau. June 22.
  • Circles or Triangles? What Shape is Your DNA? by Diahan Southard. June 29.
  • Navigating Naturalization Records by Lisa Alzo. July 6.
  • A Genealogist's Guide to Heraldry by Shannon Combs-Bennett. July 13.
  • Finding French Ancestors by Luana Darby. July 15.
  • Organize Your Online Life by Lisa Louise Cooke. July 20.
  • Researching Women - Community Cookbooks and What They Tell Us About Our Ancestors by Gena Philibert-Ortega. July 27.
  • The Germanic French - Researching Alsatian and Lorrainian Families by John Philip Colletta. July 30.
  • Solutions for Missing and Scarce Records by Tom Jones. July 30.
  • Getting Started with Microsoft PowerPoint by Thomas MacEntee. August 3.
  • The Battle for Bounty Land - War of 1812 and Mexican-American Wars by Beth Foulk. August 10.
  • Homestead Act of 1862 - Following the Witnesses by Bernice Bennett. August 12.
  • Successfully Applying to a Lineage Society by Amy Johnson Crow. August 17.
  • Using Findmypast to Unlock Your Irish Ancestry by Brian Donovan. August 24.
  • The Treasure Trove in Legislative Petitions by Judy Russell. September 14.
  • Clooz - A Document-Based Software Companion by Richard Thomas. September 16.
  • How to Use FamilySearch.org for Beginners by Devin Ashby. September 21.
  • Beginning Polish Genealogy by Lisa Alzo and Jonathan Shea. September 28.
  • AHA! Analysis of Handwriting for Genealogical Research by Ron Arons. October 5.
  • Time and Place - Using Genealogy's Cross-Hairs by Jim Beidler. October 12.
  • Finding Your Ancestors' German Hometown by Ursula Krause. October 14.
  • Social History Websites That Bring Your Ancestor's Story to Life by Gena Philibert-Ortega. October 19.
  • Flip for Flickr - Share, Store and Save Your Family Photos by Maureen Taylor. October 26.
  • Analysis and Correlation - Two Keys to Sound Conclusions by Chris Staats. November 2.
  • Publishing a Genealogy E-Book by Thomas MacEntee. November 9.
  • Dating Family Photographs by Jane Neff Rollins. November 16.
  • Nature & Nurture - Family History for Adoptees by Janet Hovorka and Amy Slade. November 18.
  • Multi-Media Story Telling by Devin Ashby. November 30.
  • Becoming a Genealogy Detective by Sharon Atkins. December 7.
  • From the Heartland - Utilizing Online Resources in Midwest Research by Luana Darby. December 14.
  • Tracing Your European Ancestors by Julie Goucher. December 16.
  • An Introduction to BillionGraves by Garth Fitzner. December 21.

Click here to register.

Print the 2016 webinar brochure here.

See you online!


Tuesday's Tip - Adding URLs to the Media Gallery

  Adding URLs to the Media Gallery


Tuesday's Tips provide brief how-to's to help you learn to use the Legacy Family Tree software with new tricks and techniques.

Adding URLs

For some reason people overlook the option to add URLs to the Media Gallery. I just added two and that is what made me think about it. These are two self-published books on FamilySearch Books that I wanted to have quick access to. These genealogies are of related lines and I am in the middle of a huge yDNA project. I am trying to attack the problem from all angles.

If I open the Media Gallery and simply double click the icon the website will launch in Google Chrome (the browser I have set in Legacy). There is a Launch Browser button on the entry screen but that is more for testing the link. You don't need to open this screen to open the URL.

I added a Simmons yDNA event and added the media there so that I could attach the event/URLs to the principles in the study. I have a few more URLs to add first and then I will share the event. I am usually more of a copy and paste events kind of girl but in this case I am pretty sure I will be updating this event with more references so sharing makes more sense. If I copy and paste I would have to update all of them.

  Urls

 

Find tech tips every day in the Facebook Legacy User Group. The group is free and is available to anyone with a Facebook account.

For video tech tips checkout the Legacy Quick Tips page.  These short videos will make it easy for you to learn all sort of fun and interesting ways to look at your genealogy research.

Michele Simmons Lewis is part of the technical support team at Millennia, the makers of the Legacy Family Tree software program. With over 20 years of research experience, Michele’s passion is helping new genealogists get started on the right foot through her writings, classes and lectures. She is the former staff genealogist and weekly columnist for the McDuffie Mirror and now authors Ancestoring, a blog geared toward the beginner/intermediate researcher.

 

 


Register for Webinar Wednesday - Ticked Off! Those Pesky Pre-1850 Census Tic Marks by Peggy Clemens Lauritzen

Register

It’s exciting when we are able to find our ancestors on every census they appeared on, until we reach 1840 and before. Those pesky tic marks seem to get in our way as we work to extend our pedigrees. Just what do they mean, and how can they help me? Are they throwing us into a dead end, or can they tell us more?

Logotransparent

Join us and Peggy Clemens Lauritzen, AG,  for the live webinar Wednesday, June 15, 2016 at 2pm Eastern U.S. Register today to reserve your virtual seat. Registration is free but space is limited to the first 1,000 people to join that day. Before joining, please visit www.java.com to ensure you have the latest version of Java which our webinar software requires. When you join, if you receive a message that the webinar is full, you know we've reached the 1,000 limit, so we invite you to view the recording which should be published to the webinar archives within an hour or two of the event's conclusion.

Download the syllabus

In preparation for the webinar, download the supplemental syllabus materials here. The syllabus is available for annual or monthly webinar subscribers. Log in here or subscribe here.

Registerbut 

Or register for multiple webinars at once by clicking here.

Not sure if you already registered?

Login to view your registration status for this webinar (available for annual or monthly webinar subscribers).

Test Your Webinar Connection

To ensure that your webinar connection is ready to go, click here.

Can't make it to the live event?

No worries. Its recording will be available for a limited time. Webinar Subscribers have unlimited access to all webinar recordings for the duration of their membership.

About the presenter

PeggyLauritzen-144x144Peggy Clemens Lauritzen, AG, was involved in genealogy before she was even born. The daughter of avid genealogists, she was spending time in courthouses and cemeteries while other children were playing on swings and going to the beach. The love of her family’s history has never left her. With her experience as a former Family History Director, she is a frequent speaker at genealogical societies, workshops, seminars, and webinars where she loves bringing genealogy to life. Some of those would include The Ohio Genealogical Society, The Ohio State University, Brigham Young University, and many other state and local genealogy societies. She has recently completed several Legacy QuickGuides on Appalachia, which are also available on www.legacyfamilytree.com and www.amazon.com.

Add it to your Google Calendar

With our Google Calendar button, you will never forget our upcoming webinars. Simply click the button to add it to your calendar. You can then optionally embed the webinar events (and even turn them on and off) into your own personal calendar. If you have already added the calendar, you do not have to do it again - the new webinar events will automatically appear.

Webinar time

The webinar will be live on Wednesday, June 15, 2016 at:

  • 2pm Eastern (U.S.)
  • 1pm Central
  • 12pm Mountain
  • 11am Pacific

Or use this Time Zone Converter.

Here's how to attend:

  1. Register at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com today. It's free!
  2. You will receive a confirmation email containing a link to the webinar.
  3. You will receive a reminder email both 1 day and 1 hour prior to the live webinar.
  4. Calculate your time zone by clicking here.
  5. Make sure you have the latest version of Java installed on your computer. Check at www.java.com.
  6. Check your GoToWebinar connection here.
  7. Click on the webinar link (found in confirmation and reminder emails) prior to the start of the webinar. Arrive early as the room size is limited to the first 1,000 arrivals that day.
  8. Listen via headset (USB headsets work best), your computer speakers, or by phone.

We look forward to seeing you all there!