Register for Webinar Wednesday - U.S. Land Records, State Land States by Mary Hill

Register

People recorded evidence of their property, paid taxes on property, gave away property, bought and sold property, fought over property, and willed property to heirs in the 20 state lands states. When understood and used properly, metes and bounds land records comprise one of the most important sources for research in America.

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Join us and Mary Hill for the live webinar Wednesday, April 13, 2016 at 8pm Eastern U.S. Register today to reserve your virtual seat. Registration is free but space is limited to the first 1,000 people to join that day. Before joining, please visit www.java.com to ensure you have the latest version of Java which our webinar software requires. When you join, if you receive a message that the webinar is full, you know we've reached the 1,000 limit, so we invite you to view the recording which should be published to the webinar archives within an hour or two of the event's conclusion.

Download the syllabus

In preparation for the webinar, download the supplemental syllabus materials here. The syllabus is available for annual or monthly webinar subscribers. Log in here or subscribe here.

Registerbut 

Or register for multiple webinars at once by clicking here.

Not sure if you already registered?

Login to view your registration status for this webinar (available for annual or monthly webinar subscribers).

Test Your Webinar Connection

To ensure that your webinar connection is ready to go, click here.

Can't make it to the live event?

No worries. Its recording will be available for a limited time. Webinar Subscribers have unlimited access to all webinar recordings for the duration of their membership.

About the presenter

MaryHill-144x144Mary E.V. Hill, MLS, AG ® (Mid-Atlantic States); worked as reference librarian at BYU from 1989-1992, as genealogy instructor at BYU from 1992-1995, as Family History Library US/Canada Reference consultant from 1995-2006. She served on the UGA Board of Directors from 2006-2008 and as an LDS missionary at the Family History Library from 2006-2008. She is the author of Saga of a Southern Loyalist: William Riddle of Virginia and North Carolina, and Angel Children. She is a lecturer with emphasis on U.S. research methods and genealogical organization. Mary is a mother and grandmother.

Add it to your Google Calendar

With our Google Calendar button, you will never forget our upcoming webinars. Simply click the button to add it to your calendar. You can then optionally embed the webinar events (and even turn them on and off) into your own personal calendar. If you have already added the calendar, you do not have to do it again - the new webinar events will automatically appear.

Webinar time

The webinar will be live on Wednesday, April 8, 2016 at:

  • 8pm Eastern (U.S.)
  • 7pm Central
  • 6pm Mountain
  • 5pm Pacific

Or use this Time Zone Converter.

Here's how to attend:

  1. Register at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com today. It's free!
  2. You will receive a confirmation email containing a link to the webinar.
  3. You will receive a reminder email both 1 day and 1 hour prior to the live webinar.
  4. Calculate your time zone by clicking here.
  5. Make sure you have the latest version of Java installed on your computer. Check at www.java.com.
  6. Check your GoToWebinar connection here.
  7. Click on the webinar link (found in confirmation and reminder emails) prior to the start of the webinar. Arrive early as the room size is limited to the first 1,000 arrivals that day.
  8. Listen via headset (USB headsets work best), your computer speakers, or by phone.

We look forward to seeing you all there!


Confirming Enslaved Ancestors Utilizing DNA - free webinar by Melvin Collier now online for limited time

2016-04-08-image500blog

The recording of today's webinar, "Confirming Enslaved Ancestors Utilizing DNA" by Melvin Collier is now available to view for free for a limited time at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com. 

With slave ancestral research, one is often faced with direct evidence vs. indirect evidence. Many forms of direct evidence that emphatically prove family relationships, birthplaces, and other happenings are often non-existent because slaves were merely considered “property”. Some researchers have been very fortunate to find rare pieces of direct evidence, in the form of old family letters, diaries, ledgers, Bibles, etc., to positively identify enslaved ancestors. Many researchers often rely on a preponderance of indirect evidence to confirm enslaved ancestors. Collier will present cases where DNA was the direct piece of evidence that identified or confirmed an enslaved ancestor.

View the Recording at FamilyTreeWebinars.com

If you could not make it to the live event or just want to watch it again, the 1 hour 30 minute recording of "Confirming Enslaved Ancestors Utilizing DNA" is now available to view in our webinar library for free. Or watch it at your convenience with an annual or monthly webinar membership.

Coupon code

Use webinar coupon code - dna16 - for 10% off anything at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com or www.LegacyFamilyTreeStore.com, valid through Monday, April 11, 2016.

Getting Started: Genetics for the Genealogist Quick Reference Guide - 5.95

Guide_DNA_GettingStartedDo you want to use DNA to further your genealogy research? This guide will help you select the DNA test (and testing company) that is right for you. It's never been easier to get started. Let Your DNA Guide show you the way! This guide provides answers so you can test with confidence:
  • Explains what DNA can and can't do for your research
  • Identifies who in your family should be tested
  • Explains privacy measures
  • Provides a comprehensive flow chart that identifies the right test for your research
  • Helps you choose the right testing company for your test and genealogy research
  • How to take the test
  • A Quick Glossary Guide to help you navigate terminology easily

Webinar Memberships/Subscriptions

Webinar Members get:

  • On-demand access to the entire webinar archives (now 336 classes, 483 hours of genealogy education)
  • On-demand access to the instructor handouts (now 1,439 pages)
  • On-demand access to the live webinars' chat logs
  • 5% off all products at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com (must be logged in at checkout)
  • Access to all future recordings for the duration of their membership
  • Chance for a members-only door prize during each live webinar
  • Access to register for bonus members-only webinars
  • Ability to view which webinars you are registered for
  • Use of the playlist, resume watching, and jump-to features

Introductory pricing:

  • Annual membership: $49.95/year
  • Monthly membership: $9.95/month

Click here to subscribe.

Register for our upcoming webinars (free)

  • U.S. Land Records - State Land States by Mary Hill. April 13.
  • Watch Geoff Live: DNA by Geoff Rasmussen and Diahan Southard. April 19.
  • Fire Insurance Maps - The Google Maps of Their Day by Jill Morelli. April 20.
  • England and Wales - Rummaging in the Parish Chests by Kirsty Gray. April 27.
  • Google Drive for Genealogists by Thomas MacEntee. May 4.
  • Dirty Pictures - Save Your Family Photos from Ruin by Denise Levenick. May 11.
  • Messages from the Grave - Listening to Your Ancestor's Tombstone by Elissa Scalise Powell. May 13.
  • Mining the Über-sites for German Ancestors by Jim Beidler. May 18.
  • Discover American Ancestors (NEHGS) by Lindsay Fulton. May 25.
  • Get the Most from AmericanAncestors.org by Claire Vail. June 1.
  • Researching Your Washington State Ancestors by Mary Roddy. June 8.
  • Introduction to the Freedmen's Bureau by Angela Walton-Raji. June 10.
  • Ticked Off! Those Pesky Pre-1850 Census Tic Marks by Peggy Clemens Lauritzen. June 15.
  • Digging Deeper in German Parish Records by Gail Blankenau. June 22.
  • Circles or Triangles? What Shape is Your DNA? by Diahan Southard. June 29.
  • Navigating Naturalization Records by Lisa Alzo. July 6.
  • A Genealogist's Guide to Heraldry by Shannon Combs-Bennett. July 13.
  • Finding French Ancestors by Luana Darby. July 15.
  • Organize Your Online Life by Lisa Louise Cooke. July 20.
  • Researching Women - Community Cookbooks and What They Tell Us About Our Ancestors by Gena Philibert-Ortega. July 27.
  • The Germanic French - Researching Alsatian and Lorrainian Families by John Philip Colletta. July 30.
  • Solutions for Missing and Scarce Records by Tom Jones. July 30.
  • Getting Started with Microsoft PowerPoint by Thomas MacEntee. August 3.
  • The Battle for Bounty Land - War of 1812 and Mexican-American Wars by Beth Foulk. August 10.
  • Homestead Act of 1862 - Following the Witnesses by Bernice Bennett. August 12.
  • Successfully Applying to a Lineage Society by Amy Johnson Crow. August 17.
  • Using Findmypast to Unlock Your Irish Ancestry by Brian Donovan. August 24.
  • The Treasure Trove in Legislative Petitions by Judy Russell. September 14.
  • Clooz - A Document-Based Software Companion by Richard Thomas. September 16.
  • How to Use FamilySearch.org for Beginners by Devin Ashby. September 21.
  • Beginning Polish Genealogy by Lisa Alzo and Jonathan Shea. September 28.
  • AHA! Analysis of Handwriting for Genealogical Research by Ron Arons. October 5.
  • Time and Place - Using Genealogy's Cross-Hairs by Jim Beidler. October 12.
  • Finding Your Ancestors' German Hometown by Ursula Krause. October 14.
  • Social History Websites That Bring Your Ancestor's Story to Life by Gena Philibert-Ortega. October 19.
  • Flip for Flickr - Share, Store and Save Your Family Photos by Maureen Taylor. October 26.
  • Analysis and Correlation - Two Keys to Sound Conclusions by Chris Staats. November 2.
  • Publishing a Genealogy E-Book by Thomas MacEntee. November 9.
  • Dating Family Photographs by Jane Neff Rollins. November 16.
  • Nature & Nurture - Family History for Adoptees by Janet Hovorka and Amy Slade. November 18.
  • Multi-Media Story Telling by Devin Ashby. November 30.
  • Becoming a Genealogy Detective by Sharon Atkins. December 7.
  • From the Heartland - Utilizing Online Resources in Midwest Research by Luana Darby. December 14.
  • Tracing Your European Ancestors by Julie Goucher. December 16.
  • An Introduction to BillionGraves by Garth Fitzner. December 21.

Click here to register.

Print the 2016 webinar brochure here.

See you online!


Using Research Logs Effectively In Genealogy

Genealogy is a growth process like any other pursuit or passion. The more I got into genealogy and researching my family tree, the more of a headache it became to remember all the information and work I did. Research logs saved the day for me, because I now had an effective method for keeping track of all my searches. I always considered myself a good note-taker during school. But research logs, to me, go a step beyond just notes. They are documents of every activity we undertake in a research project about our ancestors. This was something I had to adapt as part of my personal growth as a genealogist.

 Why does it matter to be so meticulous? Because it saves you time!

  Pocket-watch-save_time

Logging all of your searches and activities provides a great reference. Without a log of what websites and sources you’ve already checked, you might end up wasting time repeating searches. It’s easy for researchers to jump from one website to another, because we are in the zone of finding our ancestor. But consider slowing down a little bit and logging your searches. You might think you’ll remember, but these little details very rarely stay in our long-term memory and in a very short amount of time, we might forget!

When we take our work to a professional for a consultation, they often ask, “What have you checked already?" The researcher might say, “I’ve checked everything!,” but how are you able to back this up without evidence of the searches you’ve undertaken. While those involved in genealogy as a business consider research logs a necessity for client reports, those who are undertaking genealogy for personal enrichment should consider using the same tool. It will make you a better researcher and help with your desired genealogy goals. Logging the details of a particular search can help to easily demonstrate how you got that answer. What exactly did you enter into the search fields? Did you try a wildcard search or variation of the surname? These details really do matter.

Building and Using A Research Log

Creating a log is quite easy and you can create a template that works for you. My particular template was designed in Microsoft Word, which can be designed by clicking on the “Insert” Menu and scrolling down to “Table.” Alternatively, logging your research in a spreadsheet using Microsoft Excel works just as well.

I’ve seen all different kinds of logs, some with more columns for information than others, but what remains essential for a log is capturing all the details of a search. In my template, I have rows on the top to include the surname, residences, and my desired objective. The objective is important, because we might be pursuing specific research questions on an ancestor or family. In my personal template, I included five columns for recording details of a search: 

  • Date

  • Repository or Website
  • Title of Collection
  • Keyword Search
  • Results

Screen Shot 2016-04-04 at 2.49.26 PM
The date is important to log, especially for online research. Many times, a domain for a private family tree website will expire and the link could be broken when we access it at a later date.

The next column is where I write in the name of the website or database I am utilizing, or if I am are working on-site at the archives, the name of that facility. "Title of Collection" would be the name of the source and for example, if I’m trying a search from the homepage of Ancestry or Family Search, I would write in “main search engine.”

The most important columns are the next two because they capture the details of what I’m looking for and how I found or didn’t find the desire information. "Keyword Search" is where I would write in the names I’m looking for, but if there are multiple search fields for vitals, parents names, residences, etc., I am sure to include those details as well. Every site responds differently to the characters we type in or if we are using a search trick like the wildcard or search tools in Google.

In the results column, I indicate whether the search was negative or “No Matches.” When searching online, I like to include the number of results I get back with every search. It’s important data to record because I might be searching too broad or too narrow. It also might provide demographic information like how many families or individuals with that name are living in a particular jurisdiction. When we do get positive results, this is where I enter in my reference to that particular source, so I can build citations more easily. Once again, this saves considerable time. When we are creating our citation, we don’t have to backtrack to every website because it’s all right there in the research logs.

If electronic research logs are your preference, you can print blank research plan right from within the Legacy Family Tree software.

To print a Blank Research Log:

1. Choose Research Log from the Reports tab of the Ribbon bar.

2. Click either Print or Preview to view the report.

 You can also extend your use of research logs by watching the Legacy Family Tree webinar "Plan Your Way to Research Success!"

You might find that meticulously logging all this data is a bit obsessive and doesn’t apply to you necessarily. But I think we can all relate to wanting to save time and work more efficiently on our family trees, so consider using a research log as a tool for your genealogical pursuits. I’ve provided some other examples that are posted online and made available for re-use:

 

G. David Dilts. "Research Logs." FamilySearch Wiki, last modified 24 Feb 2016.  

Colleen Greene. "Evernote for Genealogy: Research Logs and Note Links." Posted 29 Jan 2014.

"Research Trackers and Organizers.FamilyTree Magazine. 

 

---

 

Jake Fletcher is a genealogist, lecturer, and blogger. Jake has been researching and writing about genealogy since 2008 on his research blog Travelogues of a Genealogist. He currently volunteers as a research assistant at the National Archives in Waltham, Massachusetts and is Vice President of the New England Association of Professional Genealogists (NEAPG).





Register for Webinar Friday - Confirming Enslaved Ancestors Utilizing DNA by Melvin Collier

Register

With slave ancestral research, one is often faced with direct evidence vs. indirect evidence. Many forms of direct evidence that emphatically prove family relationships, birthplaces, and other happenings are often non-existent because slaves were merely considered “property”. Some researchers have been very fortunate to find rare pieces of direct evidence, in the form of old family letters, diaries, ledgers, Bibles, etc., to positively identify enslaved ancestors. Many researchers often rely on a preponderance of indirect evidence to confirm enslaved ancestors. Collier will present cases where DNA was the direct piece of evidence that identified or confirmed an enslaved ancestor.

Logotransparent

Join us and Melvin Collier for the live webinar Friday, April 8, 2016 at 2pm Eastern U.S. Register today to reserve your virtual seat. Registration is free but space is limited to the first 1,000 people to join that day. Before joining, please visit www.java.com to ensure you have the latest version of Java which our webinar software requires. When you join, if you receive a message that the webinar is full, you know we've reached the 1,000 limit, so we invite you to view the recording which should be published to the webinar archives within an hour or two of the event's conclusion.

Download the syllabus

In preparation for the webinar, download the supplemental syllabus materials here. The syllabus is available for annual or monthly webinar subscribers. Log in here or subscribe here.

Registerbut 

Or register for multiple webinars at once by clicking here.

Not sure if you already registered?

Login to view your registration status for this webinar (available for annual or monthly webinar subscribers).

Test Your Webinar Connection

To ensure that your webinar connection is ready to go, click here.

Can't make it to the live event?

No worries. Its recording will be available for a limited time. Webinar Subscribers have unlimited access to all webinar recordings for the duration of their membership.

About the presenter

MelvinCollier-144x144A native of Canton, Mississippi, Melvin J. Collier is the author of:

His books have been used by genealogical and historical scholars as great reference sources for genealogical methodologies.

Melvin is a former civil engineer in corporate America for nearly 10 years. His passion for African-American history and historical preservation led to a major and fulfilling career change in the Archivist profession. He is a former archivist at the Archives Research Center of the Robert W. Woodruff Library – Atlanta University Center, where he has worked on the Morehouse College Dr. Martin Luther King Papers, the Maynard Jackson Administrative Papers and Photographs, the Dr. Asa Hilliard III Papers, and other collections, 2006-2013. Currently employed by the federal government, Melvin has been conducting historical and genealogical research for over 20 years, starting at the age of 19. He has given numerous workshops and presentations on historical and genealogical subjects. He appeared on the NBC show, Who Do You Think You Are, as one of the expert genealogists on the Spike Lee episode (2010). Melvin maintains a genealogy blog, Roots Revealed, atwww.rootsrevealed.com. He earned a Master of Arts degree in African-American Studies, Clark Atlanta University, in 2008, with additional graduate coursework in Archival Studies from Clayton State University, 2010-2012. He was the recipient of the 2012 Marsha M. Greenlee History Award by the National Afro-American Historical and Genealogical Society (AAHGS).

Add it to your Google Calendar

With our Google Calendar button, you will never forget our upcoming webinars. Simply click the button to add it to your calendar. You can then optionally embed the webinar events (and even turn them on and off) into your own personal calendar. If you have already added the calendar, you do not have to do it again - the new webinar events will automatically appear.

Webinar time

The webinar will be live on Wednesday, April 8, 2016 at:

  • 2pm Eastern (U.S.)
  • 1pm Central
  • 12pm Mountain
  • 11am Pacific
  • 6pm GMT

Or use this Time Zone Converter.

Here's how to attend:

  1. Register at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com today. It's free!
  2. You will receive a confirmation email containing a link to the webinar.
  3. You will receive a reminder email both 1 day and 1 hour prior to the live webinar.
  4. Calculate your time zone by clicking here.
  5. Make sure you have the latest version of Java installed on your computer. Check at www.java.com.
  6. Check your GoToWebinar connection here.
  7. Click on the webinar link (found in confirmation and reminder emails) prior to the start of the webinar. Arrive early as the room size is limited to the first 1,000 arrivals that day.
  8. Listen via headset (USB headsets work best), your computer speakers, or by phone.

We look forward to seeing you all there!


My DNA Results Are In! To be unveiled to the world in this LIVE webinar

Geoffdna

You inspired me. I did it. The results came back. And now I want YOU to be there!

I'm talking about my first DNA test of course. A few months back I asked for your advice about which DNA test to order. With your help and encouragement I did it. In fact, I ordered two tests - one for each of my mother's parents. And just recently I received an email with this subject line:

Your AncestryDNA results are in!

I clicked on the link and browsed around a bit. Before I looked too closely, however, I closed it down. Not because I didn't like what I saw, but because I thought I would invite YOU to be with me - LIVE! while I explored my results. What I briefly saw looked interesting, and I think it could help with one of my brick wall problems, but I wasn't really sure what I was looking at. So I invited DNA expert, Diahan Southard, to join me to interpret the results in a brand new Watch Geoff Live: DNA live webinar on April 19, 2016, where we will discover together what this DNA test is all about.

Register

The result will be a live and unscripted session giving DNA neophytes (like me, and maybe some of you) a first-hand look at what to expect from a DNA test. I'd love to share this experience with all of you, so please register for the live webinar here. Previous Watch Geoff Live! webinars have been wildly successful and I expect this one to be no different. Well, unless my DNA explains I was found under a rock like my Dad used to tell me.


Getting to Know Findmypast - Your Source for British and Irish Genealogy - free webinar by Jen Baldwin now online

2016-04-06-image500blog

The recording of today's webinar, "Getting to Know Findmypast - Your Source for British and Irish Genealogy" by Jen Baldwin is now available to view for free at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com. 

If your family has origins in the British Isles, Findmypast is a resource you should be utilizing! Learn about our incredible British and Irish collections, the advantages of using global newspapers, and get a glimpse of the new PERiodical Source Index (PERSI).

View the Recording at FamilyTreeWebinars.com

If you could not make it to the live event or just want to watch it again, the 1 hour 48 minute recording of "Getting to Know Findmypast - Your Source for British and Irish Genealogy" PLUS the after-webinar party is now available to view in our webinar library for free. Or watch it at your convenience with an annual or monthly webinar membership.

Coupon code

Use webinar coupon code - findmypast - for 10% off anything at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com or www.LegacyFamilyTreeStore.com, valid through Monday, April 11, 2016.

Webinar Memberships/Subscriptions

Webinar Members get:

  • On-demand access to the entire webinar archives (now 335 classes, 482 hours of genealogy education)
  • On-demand access to the instructor handouts (now 1,434 pages)
  • On-demand access to the live webinars' chat logs
  • 5% off all products at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com (must be logged in at checkout)
  • Access to all future recordings for the duration of their membership
  • Chance for a members-only door prize during each live webinar
  • Access to register for bonus members-only webinars
  • Ability to view which webinars you are registered for
  • Use of the playlist, resume watching, and jump-to features

Introductory pricing:

  • Annual membership: $49.95/year
  • Monthly membership: $9.95/month

Click here to subscribe.

Register for our upcoming webinars (free)

  • Confirming Enslaved Ancestors Utilizing DNA by Melvin Collier. April 8.
  • U.S. Land Records - State Land States by Mary Hill. April 13.
  • Watch Geoff Live: DNA by Geoff Rasmussen and Diahan Southard. April 19.
  • Fire Insurance Maps - The Google Maps of Their Day by Jill Morelli. April 20.
  • England and Wales - Rummaging in the Parish Chests by Kirsty Gray. April 27.
  • Google Drive for Genealogists by Thomas MacEntee. May 4.
  • Dirty Pictures - Save Your Family Photos from Ruin by Denise Levenick. May 11.
  • Messages from the Grave - Listening to Your Ancestor's Tombstone by Elissa Scalise Powell. May 13.
  • Mining the Über-sites for German Ancestors by Jim Beidler. May 18.
  • Discover American Ancestors (NEHGS) by Lindsay Fulton. May 25.
  • Get the Most from AmericanAncestors.org by Claire Vail. June 1.
  • Researching Your Washington State Ancestors by Mary Roddy. June 8.
  • Introduction to the Freedmen's Bureau by Angela Walton-Raji. June 10.
  • Ticked Off! Those Pesky Pre-1850 Census Tic Marks by Peggy Clemens Lauritzen. June 15.
  • Digging Deeper in German Parish Records by Gail Blankenau. June 22.
  • Circles or Triangles? What Shape is Your DNA? by Diahan Southard. June 29.
  • Navigating Naturalization Records by Lisa Alzo. July 6.
  • A Genealogist's Guide to Heraldry by Shannon Combs-Bennett. July 13.
  • Finding French Ancestors by Luana Darby. July 15.
  • Organize Your Online Life by Lisa Louise Cooke. July 20.
  • Researching Women - Community Cookbooks and What They Tell Us About Our Ancestors by Gena Philibert-Ortega. July 27.
  • The Germanic French - Researching Alsatian and Lorrainian Families by John Philip Colletta. July 30.
  • Solutions for Missing and Scarce Records by Tom Jones. July 30.
  • Getting Started with Microsoft PowerPoint by Thomas MacEntee. August 3.
  • The Battle for Bounty Land - War of 1812 and Mexican-American Wars by Beth Foulk. August 10.
  • Homestead Act of 1862 - Following the Witnesses by Bernice Bennett. August 12.
  • Successfully Applying to a Lineage Society by Amy Johnson Crow. August 17.
  • Using Findmypast to Unlock Your Irish Ancestry by Brian Donovan. August 24.
  • The Treasure Trove in Legislative Petitions by Judy Russell. September 14.
  • Clooz - A Document-Based Software Companion by Richard Thomas. September 16.
  • How to Use FamilySearch.org for Beginners by Devin Ashby. September 21.
  • Beginning Polish Genealogy by Lisa Alzo and Jonathan Shea. September 28.
  • AHA! Analysis of Handwriting for Genealogical Research by Ron Arons. October 5.
  • Time and Place - Using Genealogy's Cross-Hairs by Jim Beidler. October 12.
  • Finding Your Ancestors' German Hometown by Ursula Krause. October 14.
  • Social History Websites That Bring Your Ancestor's Story to Life by Gena Philibert-Ortega. October 19.
  • Flip for Flickr - Share, Store and Save Your Family Photos by Maureen Taylor. October 26.
  • Analysis and Correlation - Two Keys to Sound Conclusions by Chris Staats. November 2.
  • Publishing a Genealogy E-Book by Thomas MacEntee. November 9.
  • Dating Family Photographs by Jane Neff Rollins. November 16.
  • Nature & Nurture - Family History for Adoptees by Janet Hovorka and Amy Slade. November 18.
  • Multi-Media Story Telling by Devin Ashby. November 30.
  • Becoming a Genealogy Detective by Sharon Atkins. December 7.
  • From the Heartland - Utilizing Online Resources in Midwest Research by Luana Darby. December 14.
  • Tracing Your European Ancestors by Julie Goucher. December 16.
  • An Introduction to BillionGraves by Garth Fitzner. December 21.

Click here to register.

Print the 2016 webinar brochure here.

See you online!


Tuesday's Tip - Some Hints about Media Files

  TT - Hints about Media Files

Tuesday's Tips provide brief how-to's to help you learn to use the Legacy Family Tree software with new tricks and techniques.

Some hints about Media Files

Media files can be attached to your trees in Legacy. Media files are photo images such as jpg files. They can also be document files like MS Word. Or the can be pdf, sound or video files. You'll get the most out of your media files if you follow these "best practices."

1) It is a good idea to keep all of your Media in a single folder (subfolders within this folder are perfectly okay). What you don't want is your media scattered all over your hard drive. It is also okay to have separate main media folders for each family file you have, if you have more than one.

2) You do not have to use the Legacy default folder (the default folder is Documents\Legacy Family Tree\Media). If you use another folder then simply tell Legacy where it is in Options > Customize > 6. Locations > Option 6.2. Notice that Option 6.2 has a (ff) behind it. This means it is Family File specific and that is why it is okay to have separate media folders for your family files if you have more than one family file. You can keep your media on another drive (partitioned or external hard drive) or on cloud storage, again, all you have to do is let Legacy know where the media files are.

3) Windows imposes a 260 character limit on file paths (you can read all about Windows file paths here https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/desktop/aa365247(v=vs.85).aspx. Here is my base file path, C:\Users\Michele\Documents\Legacy Family Tree\Media\ I have already used 52 characters. For those people that have a complex system of subfolders/and or file names, you can easily get up to the Windows limit. If you are in that position, you might want to put your main media folder directly on the C: drive like this... C:\Media\ I am now down to 9 characters for my base path.

4) You do not want to have media files that have the same name. For example, 50 files named deathcertificate.jpg. A lot of people do this and think it is okay because they have all of these files in different subfolders. This is not a good idea. Every file should have a unique name.

5) Run the Media Relinker periodically just to make sure everything is okay with your Media files.

6) If you need to rename an image file, do it from within the Picture Center so that you don't lose your media link. Right now this only works for image files. There is a suggestion in the offical queue for the programmers to consider to change the Picture Center to a Media Center so that you can work with other types of files using this tool. For now you when you rename a .pdf or other type of non image file you will need to then manually relink it.

7) When you link a file, please select the correct file type from the dropdown menu (.jpg = picture, .pdf = document, .wav = sound etc.)

8) When working with images specifically, please take a look at this excellent article that Jim Terry (tech support) wrote http://support.legacyfamilytree.com/article/AA-00924

 

Find tech tips every day in the Facebook Legacy User Group. The group is free and is available to anyone with a Facebook account.

For video tech tips checkout the Legacy Quick Tips page.  These short videos will make it easy for you to learn all sort of fun and interesting ways to look at your genealogy research.

Michele Simmons Lewis is part of the technical support team at Millennia, the makers of the Legacy Family Tree software program. With over 20 years of research experience, Michele’s passion is helping new genealogists get started on the right foot through her writings, classes and lectures. She is the former staff genealogist and weekly columnist for the McDuffie Mirror and now authors Ancestoring, a blog geared toward the beginner/intermediate researcher.


Register for Webinar Wednesday - Getting to Know Findmypast - Your Source for British and Irish Genealogy

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If your family has origins in the British Isles, Findmypast is a resource you should be utilizing! Learn about our incredible British and Irish collections, the advantages of using global newspapers, and get a glimpse of the new PERiodical Source Index (PERSI).

Logotransparent

Join us and Findmypast's Jen Baldwin for the live webinar Wednesday, April 6, 2016 at 2pm Eastern U.S. Register today to reserve your virtual seat. Registration is free but space is limited to the first 1,000 people to join that day. Before joining, please visit www.java.com to ensure you have the latest version of Java which our webinar software requires. When you join, if you receive a message that the webinar is full, you know we've reached the 1,000 limit, so we invite you to view the recording which should be published to the webinar archives within an hour or two of the event's conclusion.

Download the syllabus

In preparation for the webinar, download the supplemental syllabus materials here. The syllabus is available for annual or monthly webinar subscribers. Log in here or subscribe here.

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Or register for multiple webinars at once by clicking here.

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Can't make it to the live event?

No worries. Its recording will be available for a limited time. Webinar Subscribers have unlimited access to all webinar recordings for the duration of their membership.

About the presenter

JenBaldwin-144x144Jen Baldwin is a professional genealogist and Data Acquisition Manager, North America at Findmypast. Her focus areas include the Western United States, gold rush history, fraternal societies, and using technology and social media in family history. She has authored eight Legacy QuickGuides, articles for the National Genealogical Society Magazine, IrishCentral, IrishLives Remembered, and the In-Depth Genealogist, among others, and is a course author for the National Institute of Genealogical Studies. A regular contributor of the online family history community and host of #genchat on Twitter, she is a proud volunteer for the War of 1812 Preserve the Pensions fundraising effort, and the Larimer County Genealogical Society (CO).

Add it to your Google Calendar

With our Google Calendar button, you will never forget our upcoming webinars. Simply click the button to add it to your calendar. You can then optionally embed the webinar events (and even turn them on and off) into your own personal calendar. If you have already added the calendar, you do not have to do it again - the new webinar events will automatically appear.

Webinar time

The webinar will be live on Wednesday, April 6, 2016 at:

  • 2pm Eastern (U.S.)
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Or use this Time Zone Converter.

Here's how to attend:

  1. Register at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com today. It's free!
  2. You will receive a confirmation email containing a link to the webinar.
  3. You will receive a reminder email both 1 day and 1 hour prior to the live webinar.
  4. Calculate your time zone by clicking here.
  5. Make sure you have the latest version of Java installed on your computer. Check at www.java.com.
  6. Check your GoToWebinar connection here.
  7. Click on the webinar link (found in confirmation and reminder emails) prior to the start of the webinar. Arrive early as the room size is limited to the first 1,000 arrivals that day.
  8. Listen via headset (USB headsets work best), your computer speakers, or by phone.

We look forward to seeing you all there!


The Top 10 Genealogy Classes of March 2016

We've tallied the numbers and made a list of the Top 10 FamilyTreeWebinars.com classes for March 2016! Are your favorite topics or instructors among the list? Need something new to learn? Use the list to get inspired!

Top10

Each month thousands of Legacy Family Tree Webinar subscribers head for the library to learn new skills and techniques to help improve their genealogy research. Among the now-334 genealogy classes in the members-only library, these were the most frequently played during the month of March 2016.  They aren't necessarily the newest classes but rather the topics that were sought out by our members.

Have you seen any of these classes? Are these among your favorites too? Some of these classes (and topics) might be new to you! Get inspired to learn more and make your genealogy journey more fun!

The Top 10 for March 2016

1. Making YDNA and mtDNA Part of Your Family History by Diahan Southard

2. FamilySearch Pilot Tool by FamilySearch.org panel

3. How Do I Know That's My Ancestor? by Amy Johnson Crow

4. Introduction to German Parish Records by Gail Blankenau

5. A Guided Tour of Cyndi's List 2.0 by Cnydi Ingle

6. The War of 1812 Records - Preserving the Pensions by Rebecca Whitman Koford

7. Microsoft Word Series - #1 Getting Started with Microsoft Word by Thomas MacEntee

8. The Private Laws of the Federal and State Governments by Judy Russell

9. Proof Arguments - How to Write Them and Why They Matter by Warren Bittner

10. You Know Your Irish Ancestors Came to America, But What Was the Voyage Like? by Tom Kemp

The Runner-Ups

11. Irish Records in US Newspapers by Tom Kemp

12. 7 Unique Technologies for Genealogy Discoveries at MyHeritage by Mike Mansfield

13. Legacy Family Tree and FamilySearch Family Tree by Geoff Rasmussen

14. Searching for Surnames in Canada by Kathryn Lake Hogan

15. Sources and Citations Made Simple, Standard, and Powerful by Geoff Rasmussen

16. Irish Church and Civil Registration by Maurice Gleeson

17. Problem Solving with FANs by Beth Foulk

18. Microsoft Word Series - #2 Formatting Basics by Thomas MacEntee

19. Solving Genealogy Problems with Timelines by Beth Foulk

20. Irish-American Catholic Genealogy by Michael Brophy

Access to classes in the Legacy Family Tree Webinar library are available with an annual or monthly membership. Not a member? Become one! Or watch one of our free classes here.


How Mobile Were Our Ancestors?

How Mobile Were Our Ancestors Library of Congress image

Do you think your ancestors stayed in one place? Guess again! A prevalent myth among genealogists is that our ancestors could not, and did not, travel freely.

The truth is that many of our ancestors traveled frequently. They were much more mobile than most of us realize. When you look across the centuries, you can find examples of our ancestors’ frequent trips in times when travel was difficult, slow, and often expensive.

While it may be true that our immigrant ancestors returned home more frequently in later centuries, after ships’ travel became faster, easier, and less expensive, we should not assume this is the case. I have found many 17th century immigrant ancestors who frequently sailed back and forth from their new land to their homeland.

17th Century Travel

Even though they could not simply hop on an airplane as we do, many of our 17th century ancestors didn’t hesitate to make the long journey home many times. I suppose it should not be surprising when we consider the fact that these early pioneers were willing to leave friends and family to settle in an unknown wilderness.

Tall Ships
Tall Ships

Many early settlers in the New World of North America travelled frequently back to Europe. Several of my Dutch ancestors who settled in New Netherland (present day New York) as early as 1630 returned to Holland on more than one occassion. Often they sailed back to settle wills or collect an inheritance from a family member. Sometimes they took a ship back to visit relatives or attend a wedding, just as we do today. Legal matters were also of importance and those were often the reason for a brief visit to their homeland.

Of course there were also individuals who might not be permanent settlers, but who travelled frequently due to the nature of their occupations. Soldiers, beaurocrats, sailors, and those with business interests were often among those non-settlers who made frequent trips from their homeland.

19th Century Travel

Many years ago I had the privilege of reading original letters sent in 1839 and 1847 from my great-great-grandfather to his mother in Illinois. In one letter he tells her how much he misses her and his siblings, and how he plans to come for a visit in the fall. 

1847 Letter Levi Excerpt
Excerpt from 1847 letter Levi Peer to Elizabeth Peer
Original letter owned by Marsha Peer (Swanson) Lindstrom

 I remember how surprised I was when I read that my ancestor lived in the wilds of what is now Ontario, which then was a newly settled country, and little more than a wilderness. There were very few roads, and no reliable method of ground transportation other than horse and wagon, only a horse, or by foot. From his home in Ontario it was over 500 miles to his mother’s home in Illinois.

Since great-great grandpa did not own a horse, it is likely that he planned on hitching a ride in a wagon going from his home to a larger center such as York (now Toronto) or Hamilton.

From there he could have taken a boat across Lake Ontario and then to Buffalo, but it is more likely he took a wagon directly to Buffalo. Once in Buffalo a boat would have taken him along the shores of Lake Erie, or he could have continued his journey by wagon. I’m quite sure he would have walked for much of the journey. At some point he likely took a raft down the Ohio River to his mother’s home in Illinois. To me that seems like an arduous journey and not one I would want to take, but the mention of his plans in his letter was casual as if it were not an unusual thing to do.

Lack of work also took our ancestors far from home. If a man could not find a job to support his family, there was nothing stopping him from travelling long distances if he heard that jobs were available elswhere. One of my Irish ancestors who left Ireland during the Famine Years to settle in Canada, left Canada for work in Colorado. His family stayed behind in their new home and he spent several years working far from home. It appears from records that he returned for visits now and again.

With the explosive expansion of the railroads in the second half of the 19th century, people became more mobile than ever. Suddenly travel was easy and inexpensive, and people from many walks of life were now able to travel for work as well as for pleasure.

Passengers waiting for the Illinois Central Railroad train ca 1882  Credit: Library of Congress
Passengers waiting for the Illinois Central Railroad train ca 1882
Photo credit: Library of Congress

We should remember that our ancestors were no different than we are. They laughed, loved, cried, celebrated success, mourned over loss and failure, and missed family far away. There are numerous reasons they travelled, and we should always keep in mind that they were not stuck in one place – they travelled as needed, and when they wanted to.

What tales do you have of your traveling ancestors?

 

Lorine McGinnis Schulze is a Canadian genealogist who has been involved with genealogy and history for more than thirty years. In 1996 Lorine created the Olive Tree Genealogy website and its companion blog. Lorine is the author of many published genealogical and historical articles and books.