The Top 10 Genealogy Classes of August 2016

We've tallied the numbers and made a list of the Top 10 FamilyTreeWebinars.com classes for August 2016! Are your favorite topics or instructors among the list? Need something new to learn? Use the list to get inspired!

Top10

Each month thousands of Legacy Family Tree Webinar subscribers head for the library to learn new skills and techniques to help improve their genealogy research. Among the now-410 genealogy classes in the members-only library, these were the most frequently played during the month of August 2016.  They aren't necessarily the newest classes but rather the topics that were sought out by our members.

Have you seen any of these classes? Are these among your favorites too? Some of these classes (and topics) might be new to you! Get inspired to learn more and make your genealogy journey more fun!

The Top 10 for August 2016

1. Getting Started with Microsoft PowerPoint by Thomas MacEntee

2. Using Findmypast to Unlock Your Irish Ancestry by Brian Donovan

3. Foundations in DNA 1 of 5: Genealogy and DNA by Blaine Bettinger

4. Solutions for Missing and Scarce Records by Tom Jones, CG

5. Successfully Applying to a Lineage Society by Amy Johnson Crow, CG

6. The Battle for Bounty Land - War of 1812 and Mexican-American Wars by Beth Foulk

7. Another Kind of Navigation: GPS for Genealogy by Shellee Morehead, CG

8. Homestead Act of 1862 - Following the Witnesses by Bernice Bennett

9. Windows 10 Survival Guide for Genealogists by Thomas MacEntee

10. The Germanic French - Researching Alsatian and Lorrainian Families by John Philip Colletta

The Runner-Ups

11. Finding French Ancestors by Luana Darby

12. Watch Geoff Live: Adding Online Records to Legacy by Geoff Rasmussen

13. Foundations in DNA 2 of 5: DNA Overview by Blaine Bettinger

14. Foundations in DNA 5 of 5: Autosomal DNA by Blaine Bettinger

15. Foundations in DNA 3 of 5: Y-DNA by Blaine Bettinger

16. Sources and Citations Made Simple, Standard, and Powerful by Geoff Rasmussen

17. Finding Your Early 1800s US Ancestors Online by James M. Baker, CG

18. Foundations in DNA 4 of 5: Mitochondrial DNA by Blaine Bettinger

19. Organize Your Online Life by Lisa Louise Cooke

20. Kinship Determination: From Generation to Generation by Judy Russell, CG, CGL

Access to classes in the Legacy Family Tree Webinar library are available with an annual or monthly membership. Not a member? Become one! Or watch one of our free classes here.


Three Ways to Search for Slovak Ancestors

Curious about your Slovak roots, but don’t know where to being?  Not sure how to identify your ancestral town or village, or where to find records online?  Below are three simple ways to jumpstart your Slovak genealogy.

 

Three Ways to Search for Slovak Ancestors

 

1. Utilize FamilySearch. Of course the first step in genealogy is to check home sources and talk to your relatives to determine your Slovak immigrant ancestor’s original name and his or her town/village of origin. But sometimes the information you find is incomplete, skewed by family lore, or perhaps even non-existent. So you will need to go in search of vital, census, immigration, naturalization, and other records. Many of these resources can be found online in free databases on FamilySearch, and on other subscriptions sites (just remember that not everything is online). The good news is that FamilySearch also has record collections from Slovakia that are searchable online. Currently, the two most notable are: Slovakia, Church and Synagogue Books, 1592-1910 and Slovakia, Census, 1869. Access them here. In addition, you should search the FamilySearch catalog—it is one of the best sources for microfilmed records from Slovakia, including parish, military, and census records. You can view the films in person at the library in Salt Lake City, or order films online for viewing at your local Family History Center or partnering library. Be sure to check the Family Search Wiki page for Slovakia. Here you’ll find tips on accessing Slovak vital records beginning Slovak research, and determining a place of origin in Slovakia, many links to records, maps, and more. 

2. Scour Other Websites. Today there are websites for every genealogy research interest and Slovak genealogy is no different. Below are a couple of websites to explore.

Cisarik.com. This useful site compiled by Slovak tourist guide/archival researcher Juraj Čisárik, has many interesting resources including: A listing of former counties of Slovakia—Austria-Hungary Empire—prior 1918 (and maps); A listing of current counties in Slovakia today (with a map); a clickable, alphabetical index of all villages in Slovakia; a link to a Carpatho-Rusyn DNA project through Family Tree DNA; Oldslavonic - English Dictionary (5100 words) and English –Old Slavonic Dictionary (5100 words); Information on religions in Slovakia (Roman Catholic, Greek Catholic, Orthodox, Reformed Calvinist, Evangelical Lutheran, and Jewish); Marriage Records of Eastern Slovakia 1865 – 1895; Information about a book on the genealogy of Byzantine priests in Slovakia from 1600-2010 published by Cisarik. (You can see an index of all the names included).

There is quite a bit of content to navigate through but it is very well organized. It’s worth looking through the alphabetical list of marriages. These are selected by surnames of grooms and brides with a current total of 14,735 marriage records. The surnames and first names are written in the old original spelling. If your ancestor’s surname was Americanized it could be spelled differently. You may have to search for various alternatives of a particular surname’s spelling. (Use CTRL+f on a PC or command+F on a Mac to quickly search the listings there). I found the names of the current counties and the former Hungarian counties to be quite helpful when searching for my various ancestral villages.

Slovak Genealogy Research Strategies. Slovak Genealogy Research Strategies is a very informative set of free web pages by Bill Tarkulich that aid English-speaking researchers of immigrants from Eastern Slovakia and surrounding areas. This Web site includes genealogical research strategies, methods and  unique resources for people with roots in Eastern Slovakia (Slovak Republic)/formerly Czechoslovakia/formerly Upper Hungary. Primary research areas include those of the Carpathian Mountains, and borderlands of Southern Poland (Galicia) and Western Ukraine (Carpatho-Rus).

The entire site is full of great information, such as present and former place names, a step-by-step guide to using the The 1877 Dvorzsák Gazetteer, and detailed pages on how to locate and acquire church, census, and military records for your Slovak ancestors, as well as a host of sample records. Be sure to take the time to explore the site in its entirety. Bookmark the Quick Reference Toolbox  for easy access to key resources on the site.

3. Tap into the Resources of an Ethnic Genealogical Society. If you want to connect with other Slovak researchers, consider joining The Czechoslovak Genealogical Society International (CGSI). CGSI is a society promoting Czechoslovak genealogical research and interest among people with ancestry in the Czechoslovak region as it was in 1918, including families of Czech, Bohemian, Moravian, Slovak, German, Hungarian, Jewish, Rusyn, and Silesian origin.

Cgsipage

This organization publishes a quarterly newsletter Nase rodina (Our Family) , holds a bi-annual national conference in a location with a strong Czech and Slovak history (the next conference will be October 17-21, 2017 in Pittsburgh, PA), a Fall Annual Meeting, and symposiums. There are members-only databases available on the society’s website as well as a message board and surname database. You can also check out the CGSI Facebook page.

 

To learn more about these and other resources for Slovak genealogy, watch the webinar on Beginning Slovak Genealogy Research available to Legacy Family Tree Webinar subscribers.

Beginningslovakgenealogy

You can also pick up a copy of the Legacy Family Tree QuickGuide on Slovak Genealogy.

 

Lisa A. Alzo, M.F.A. is a freelance writer, instructor and internationally recognized lecturer specializing in Eastern European genealogy, writing your family history, and finding female and immigrant ancestors.  She is the author of 10 books, including The Family Tree Polish, Czech and Slovak Genealogy Guide, and the award-winning Three Slovak Women.  Lisa is a frequent speaker for Legacy Family Tree Webinars, and blogs at The Accidental Genealogist. She can be reached at http://www.lisaalzo.com.

 

 


10 Ways to Jumpstart Your Genealogy When it Stalls

The proverbial brick wall. We all hit it at one time or another. You've searched every single document you can think of but you simply can't get past a certain time period or event for an ancestor.

Brick_Wall
Maybe you can't find Grandmother Mabel on that 1850 census but you have her in 1860 and you know she is hiding somewhere!

Perhaps Great-grandfather James is keeping his Irish origins hidden and you can't go any further unless you can figure out where in Ireland you need to look!

That's when you need to jumpstart your genealogy research. You need fresh ideas, fresh eyes and you need to be rejuvenated.

Here are 10 Ways to Jumpstart Your Genealogy:

1. Revisit and review old research
Take out all your research on that brickwall ancestor. Go over it again. Read it carefully, analyze it, see if there are clues there you might have missed the first time around. I've written about my own reviews of old research and the new clues Ive found at Why Review Old Genealogy Research? and Everyone Makes Mistakes: Why You Should Review Your Research Notes 

2. Search siblings!

Remember that siblings share common ancestors. Even half-siblings share at least one parent. You may find that your ancestor’s brother or sister’s obituary has the information you have been seeking.
 

Boy-990325_640
3. Search a different ancestor or family line

Sometimes it's time to set Grandmother Mabel aside for a bit and work on someone else. when you are ready to go back to the puzzle of Grandmother Mabel, you may find that fresh eyes will make all the difference in the world.

4. Find a genealogy buddy who will brainstorm with you 
I always brainstorm with my husband when I have a challenging genealogy mystery. It's beneficial to have someone approach the mystery with a different outlook. Often that person comes up with something that you didn't think of.

5. Make a chronological timeline of your ancestor's life events.
This is one of the most helpful ways to organize your thoughts and see at a glance where the holes are in your research. Making a timeline for one of my husband's challenging ancestors I noted that I had his baptism record, immigration record, marriage record, births of children, death of his wife and then his death.

However I did not have a record of land he might have purchased or rented and that sent me off a hunt for those records. To my surprise there was mention of him selling his land to his wife for $1.00 then buying it back two years later. That in turn led me to think about what happened in those two years? Why had he sold the land and then bought it back? Long story short, eventually I found out he had gone to jail in that time.

6. Look for alternate or obscure records. There may be tax records, or perhaps you can find a coffin plate at http://ancestorsatrest.com/coffin_plates/ for an ancestor. Try finding a funeral card at http://ancestorsatrest.com/funeral_cards/ or a medical record.

 

Coffin plate in collection of Brian L. Massey, published with permission
Coffin plate in collection of Brian L. Massey, published with permission

 

7. Search newspapers for mention of an ancestor. I found a brief notice in a local newspaper for my great-grandfather Alexander McGinnis, stating he had been sent to jail for selling liquor without a licence!

8. Talk to family members. Someone, somewhere, might have that tidbit of information you need. My husband and I searched for years for the baptism of his great-grandfather. What we didn’t know was that he was Catholic so we were searching in the wrong church records. One day my husband’s grandmother casually mentioned that her mother used to sprinkle holy water on her during thunderstorms! Bingo! I knew we had to look in Catholic records.

 

ID-DNA green purple

9. Take a DNA test. DNA will match you with others who share a common ancestor. You will have to work to discover the link but many new discoveries can, and do, occur when you have your DNA tested. See DNA Genealogy - Choosing DNA Groups to Join for help if you have not yet had your DNA tested

10. Take a break
Yep that's right. Sometimes it's time to say "Enough!". Put your genealogy aside and go for a walk, or out for lunch with friends, or to a movie. Do something relaxing such as read a book, or visit a museum....  do something completely different and you may find yourself coming back to your research in a better mood and with new ideas.

For more ideas on breaking down brick walls see Ten Brick Wall Tips for Beginners and Ten Brick Wall Tips for Intermediate Researchers in the Legacy Family Tree Webinars library.

 

Lorine McGinnis Schulze is a Canadian genealogist who has been involved with genealogy and history for more than thirty years. In 1996 Lorine created the Olive Tree Genealogy website and its companion blog. Lorine is the author of many published genealogical and historical articles and books.


Legacy Tip - entering the good and the bad

With today's discovery I experienced both ends of the genealogical excitement spectrum. I experienced the high end when I discovered Jane Goodhue in an 1879 newspaper - I had no idea she was still alive then! But when I read why the article was written, I felt extreme sadness for her.

2016-08-29_8-39-02

Jane Goodhue was the first wife of my 3rd great-great uncle, Joshua Marsden Brown. I have many good memories researching his life, and thus I've developed a kind of genealogical bond with him. But I've always struggled to discover what happened to Jane. I last found her listed on the 1860 census, and then never again. Because I couldn't find her in the 1870, 1880, or other state census records, and since Joshua remarried in 1888, I figured she must have sometime between 1860 and 1880. Yet my in-depth searching of death, cemetery and other records came up empty.

After renewing my newspapers.com subscription this weekend, I began doing random searches for some of my favorite families and wow was I ever delighted to see 5 matches for "Marsden Brown" in Minnesota.

2

The "Minneapolis News" section of the July 3, 1879 edition of The Saint Paul Globe had an article about Marsden and his wife, "Nancy J. Brown"! Years ago I was ecstatic was I learned that Marsden had a first name (Joshua) and now I've learned the same of Jane. I also now know that she was alive as of about this date. But reading further put a damper on my excitement.

3

So Marsden - my Marsden - wasn't such a good guy. Yet while he was accused of cruel and inhuman treatment, habitual drunkenness, not supporting his family, and threatening to take her life - all terrible, terrible things - I struggle to know how to feel about him. No woman or family should ever be treated that way, but it makes me wonder what led to this. Did he recover? Did he change? What happened to her? Did she find someone new that loved and took care of her? Was she able to forgive him? How were their children affected? I guess these are all questions we begin to ask when we feel a connection with our ancestors.

Regardless of the emotions, the newspaper article had some very good new information about the family that I needed to document in Legacy. Speaking of documentation, here's how I set up the Master Source and the Source Details in case you're interested.

Master Source

4

Source Details

5

After adding the source to the source clipboard, I added a custom event so the lawsuit information would be included in both Marsden and Jane's timelines.

6

Here's the Event screen enlarged:

7

I then shared the event with Marsden by clicking on the Share button, and updated his "role" to "defendant". Now this event shows up in both of their event sections.

10

I also updated her name and her death date:

8

I also learned from an article on August 17, 1879 that she won the case: "in the case of Mary J. Brown vs. Marsden Brown - judgement for plaintiff". So now I have another name for Jane.

I next learned from the Minnesota Historical Society that they have the actual case files so I just placed a research order for them, and of course, added this to my To Do List in Legacy:

9

I'm really looking forward to seeing what is in the divorce case. Maybe it will help me answer some of my questions, and hopefully it will point me in a new direction to learn more about Mary Nancy Jane Goodhue Brown.


Finding French Ancestors - free webinar by Luana Darby now online for limited time

2016-08-26-image500blog

The recording of today's webinar, "Finding French Ancestors" by Brian Donovan is now available to view for a limited time for free at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com. 

Webinar Description

From Alsace-Lorraine to Paris and Huguenots to nobility, discover key resources for French research and techniques to meet challenges on both sides of the ocean.

View the Recording at FamilyTreeWebinars.com

If you could not make it to the live event or just want to watch it again, the 1 hour 31 minute recording of "Finding French Ancestors" is now available to view in our webinar library for free for a limited time. Or watch it at your convenience with an annual or monthly webinar membership.

479French Genealogy Research - 3.95

We start with a couple of interesting facts: 8.3 million Americans (3% of the total population) claimed French ancestry in the 2000 U.S. census, and 2.4 million Americans (0.9% of the population) claimed French-Canadian ancestry. Thus, with over 10 million Americans of French origin, this research guide was almost inevitable, and in true Genealogy at a Glance fashion, it lays out the basic elements of French research in just four pages, boiling the subject down to its essence and allowing you to grasp the fundamentals of French genealogical research at a glance.
 
Consisting of Huguenots, Acadian refugees, and political exiles, the French contingent in America has always been viewed as a distinct element in the population, concentrated for the most part in Louisiana, New England, and the Midwest. Connecting these individuals to France and tracing them back through the earliest records, is the particular challenge of this research guide.
 
French research, we learn, starts with the vital records of birth, marriage, and death. These records fall into two categories: parish registers before 1792 and civil registrations after 1792. Because most records used initially in French research were created at the town level, identifying an ancestor’s town of origin is critical. Once determined (with tips given here to make it easier), research is generally conducted in the rich collections of departmental archives, including notarial records and censuses that are gradually being digitized and placed online. Municipal archives and libraries are rapidly digitizing their records as well, and the final section of this paper concludes with a list of helpful websites. The four specially laminated pages of this work are designed to provide as much useful information in the space allotted as you’ll ever need. No research tool in French genealogy is as effortless and as convenient.

4 pages | Published 2012 | PDF Edition
 

Webinar Memberships/Subscriptions

Webinar Members get:

  • On-demand access to the entire webinar archives (now 405 classes, 571 hours of genealogy education)
  • On-demand access to the instructor handouts (now 1,763 pages)
  • On-demand access to the live webinars' chat logs
  • 5% off all products at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com (must be logged in at checkout)
  • Access to all future recordings for the duration of their membership
  • Chance for a members-only door prize during each live webinar
  • Access to register for bonus members-only webinars
  • Ability to view which webinars you are registered for
  • Use of the playlist, resume watching, and jump-to features

Introductory pricing:

  • Annual membership: $49.95/year
  • Monthly membership: $9.95/month

Click here to subscribe.

Register for our upcoming webinars (free)

  • The Treasure Trove in Legislative Petitions by Judy Russell. September 14.
  • Clooz - A Document-Based Software Companion by Richard Thomas. September 16.
  • Finding Evidence of Kinship in Military Records by Rick Sayre, CG, CGL, FUGA. September 20. Hosted by the Board for Certification of Genealogists.
  • How to Use FamilySearch.org for Beginners by Devin Ashby. September 21.
  • Beginning Polish Genealogy by Lisa Alzo and Jonathan Shea. September 28.
  • AHA! Analysis of Handwriting for Genealogical Research by Ron Arons. October 5.
  • Time and Place - Using Genealogy's Cross-Hairs by Jim Beidler. October 12.
  • Finding Your Ancestors' German Hometown by Ursula Krause. October 14.
  • Educational Preparation for Certification: Many Paths to the Same Goal by Angela Packer McGhie, CG. October 18. Hosted by the Board for Certification of Genealogists.
  • Social History Websites That Bring Your Ancestor's Story to Life by Gena Philibert-Ortega. October 19.
  • Flip for Flickr - Share, Store and Save Your Family Photos by Maureen Taylor. October 26.
  • Analysis and Correlation - Two Keys to Sound Conclusions by Chris Staats. November 2.
  • Publishing a Genealogy E-Book by Thomas MacEntee. November 9.
  • Dating Family Photographs by Jane Neff Rollins. November 16.
  • Nature & Nurture - Family History for Adoptees by Janet Hovorka and Amy Slade. November 18.
  • Multi-Media Story Telling by Devin Ashby. November 30.
  • Becoming a Genealogy Detective by Sharon Atkins. December 7.
  • From the Heartland - Utilizing Online Resources in Midwest Research by Luana Darby. December 14.
  • Tracing Your European Ancestors by Julie Goucher. December 16.
  • An Introduction to BillionGraves by Garth Fitzner. December 21.

Click here to register.

Print the 2016 webinar brochure here.

See you online!


It's Here! Pre-order your "Life is Short, Do Genealogy First" Limited Edition t-shirt today

Unisex4This is the genea-T-shirt I've been looking forward to for a long time. And thanks to your prodding, it's almost ready to wear!

Just think of all of the problems it will help us overcome:

  • When your house is a mess, and you're still sitting at the computer, be sure you're wearing the shirt.
  • When your spouse wonders why you come to bed so late, remind them of the shirt you're wearing.
  • When you leave early from the gym, just point to the shirt.

So here's the scoop. I'll probably only do one printing of the shirts, making them rare, limited editions. They're available in lots of sizes, four colors, and both a unisex and a ladies style. So you'll need to place your order soon, and no later than Friday, September 9. As soon as I return home from our Legacy Genealogy Cruise to Alaska (don't you wish you were coming with?) I'm going to get the shirts made.

More incentives...

Because it would be so fun to see so many of you in these "Life is Short, Do Genealogy First" shirts, I am going to add a little more incentive for you (as if the rare, limited edition stylish, comfortable, and durable shirts weren't enough...):

Ladies4Order by Friday, September 9, and I'll include a copy of my Kindred Voices: Listening for our Ancestors book for free! And just in case you already have a copy of it, I'll also include a free digital download of my popular webinar Watch Geoff Live! DNA edition. You'll get instant download delivery of both of these products. My way of saying THANKS!

How to order

Just click the orange button below, select your style, size and color. Unisex shirts are $14.95 and the ladies shirts are $16.95. (XXL and XXXL are a little extra.)

Buynowbutton

Shipping date

After placing the order, you'll immediately receive the link to download the book and webinar. But you'll need to wait until the end of September for your shirts to ship.

Remember, limited edition...

Speaking of shirts in the plural form, and knowing that this will likely be the only opportunity to get yours, you'll probably want at least one of each color. And you'll need to get one for your non-interested spouse for that glorious day when the genealogy bug bites them. And when the holidays come around, because you prepared in advance and added an extra one or two to your shopping cart, you'll have no problems with the last-minute gifts for your genealogy buddies.

Whether you buy 0 or 5, nothing will change the fact that "Life is short, do genealogy first!"

Wording


Register for Webinar Friday - Finding French Ancestors by Luana Darby

Register

From Alsace-Lorraine to Paris and Huguenots to nobility, discover key resources for French research and techniques to meet challenges on both sides of the ocean.

Logotransparent

Join us and Luana Darby for the live webinar Friday, August 26, 2016 at 2pm Eastern U.S. Register today to reserve your virtual seat. Registration is free but space is limited to the first 1,000 people to join that day. Before joining, please visit www.java.com to ensure you have the latest version of Java which our webinar software requires. When you join, if you receive a message that the webinar is full, you know we've reached the 1,000 limit, so we invite you to view the recording which should be published to the webinar archives within an hour or two of the event's conclusion.

Download the syllabus

In preparation for the webinar, download the supplemental syllabus materials here. The syllabus is available for annual or monthly webinar subscribers. Log in here or subscribe here.

Registerbut 

Or register for multiple webinars at once by clicking here.

Not sure if you already registered?

Login to view your registration status for this webinar (available for annual or monthly webinar subscribers).

Test Your Webinar Connection

To ensure that your webinar connection is ready to go, click here.

Can't make it to the live event?

No worries. Its recording will be available for a limited time. Webinar Subscribers have unlimited access to all webinar recordings for the duration of their membership.

LuanaDarby-144x144About the presenter

Luana Darby, MLIS, is a Salt Lake City based genealogist who specializes in the U.S. Midwest, Palatine German, LDS, and American patriot research. Her love for genealogy came from listening to stories at her grandmother's knee while a young girl. She has been working with clients for over 20 years and is a frequent speaker at conferences, workshops, and institutes. She is past president of the Utah Genealogical Association.

Add it to your Google Calendar

With our Google Calendar button, you will never forget our upcoming webinars. Simply click the button to add it to your calendar. You can then optionally embed the webinar events (and even turn them on and off) into your own personal calendar. If you have already added the calendar, you do not have to do it again - the new webinar events will automatically appear.

Webinar time

The webinar will be live on Friday, August 26, 2016 at:

  • 2pm Eastern (U.S.)
  • 1pm Central
  • 12pm Mountain
  • 11am Pacific

Or use this Time Zone Converter.

Here's how to attend:

  1. Register at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com today. It's free!
  2. You will receive a confirmation email containing a link to the webinar.
  3. You will receive a reminder email both 1 day and 1 hour prior to the live webinar.
  4. Calculate your time zone by clicking here.
  5. Make sure you have the latest version of Java installed on your computer. Check at www.java.com.
  6. Check your GoToWebinar connection here.
  7. Click on the webinar link (found in confirmation and reminder emails) prior to the start of the webinar. Arrive early as the room size is limited to the first 1,000 arrivals that day.
  8. Listen via headset (USB headsets work best), your computer speakers, or by phone.

We look forward to seeing you all there!


Using Findmypast to Unlock Your Irish Ancestry - free webinar by Findmypast's Brian Donovan now online

2016-08-24-image500blog

The recording of today's webinar, "Using Findmypast to Unlock Your Irish Ancestry" by Brian Donovan is now available to view for free at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com. 

Webinar Description

There are over 100 million unique Irish genealogical records at findmypast.com, by far the largest collection anywhere online. But using them well is the subject of this talk. Brian will talk through the many collections available online, focusing on those records which are most valuable for Irish research.

View the Recording at FamilyTreeWebinars.com

If you could not make it to the live event or just want to watch it again, the 1 hour 51 minute recording of "Using Findmypast to Unlock Your Irish Ancestry" (includes the after-webinar party) is now available to view in our webinar library for free. Or watch it at your convenience with an annual or monthly webinar membership.

Pocket Guide to Irish Genealogy Third Edition by Brian Mitchell - 9.95

The Third Edition of Brian Mitchell's Pocket Guide to Irish Genealogy is, page for page, perhaps the best book on genealogical research in Ireland ever written.
 
By skillfully blending case studies, maps, charts, and his own mastery of the subject, Mitchell has managed to convey the basics of Irish genealogical research in scarcely eighty pages. Following introductory chapters on the background of research on the American side, the author describes the nature and uses of all significant record sources in Ireland, including but not limited to civil and parish registers, gravestone inscriptions, wills, the Griffith's Valuation, tithe books, the 1901 and 1911 censuses, newspapers, hearth money rolls, the registry of deeds, estate records, and ordnance survey memoirs. Another important chapter explains the differences between the various administrative divisions of Ireland, knowledge of which is critical in tracking down all available records on Irish ancestors. The Third Edition includes a new chapter on "Irish Genealogy and the Internet," which discusses all the principal web sites for conducting Irish research online. Mitchell has also totally overhauled and updated the book's two concluding chapters, which cover Ireland's major genealogical record offices and heritage centers. The critical chapters furnish the addresses and phone numbers, hours of operation, contact persons, and major record holdings and databases of the organizations that are central to Irish family history. Enriched by the author's experience as a professional geographer, genealogical researcher, and director of an Irish heritage center, the Pocket Guide to Irish Genealogy is an outstanding value!

83 pages | Published 2008, reprinted 2009 | PDF Edition
 

Webinar Memberships/Subscriptions

Webinar Members get:

  • On-demand access to the entire webinar archives (now 404 classes, 569 hours of genealogy education)
  • On-demand access to the instructor handouts (now 1,763 pages)
  • On-demand access to the live webinars' chat logs
  • 5% off all products at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com (must be logged in at checkout)
  • Access to all future recordings for the duration of their membership
  • Chance for a members-only door prize during each live webinar
  • Access to register for bonus members-only webinars
  • Ability to view which webinars you are registered for
  • Use of the playlist, resume watching, and jump-to features

Introductory pricing:

  • Annual membership: $49.95/year
  • Monthly membership: $9.95/month

Click here to subscribe.

Register for our upcoming webinars (free)

  • Finding French Ancestors by Luana Darby. August 26.
  • The Treasure Trove in Legislative Petitions by Judy Russell. September 14.
  • Clooz - A Document-Based Software Companion by Richard Thomas. September 16.
  • Finding Evidence of Kinship in Military Records by Rick Sayre, CG, CGL, FUGA. September 20. Hosted by the Board for Certification of Genealogists.
  • How to Use FamilySearch.org for Beginners by Devin Ashby. September 21.
  • Beginning Polish Genealogy by Lisa Alzo and Jonathan Shea. September 28.
  • AHA! Analysis of Handwriting for Genealogical Research by Ron Arons. October 5.
  • Time and Place - Using Genealogy's Cross-Hairs by Jim Beidler. October 12.
  • Finding Your Ancestors' German Hometown by Ursula Krause. October 14.
  • Educational Preparation for Certification: Many Paths to the Same Goal by Angela Packer McGhie, CG. October 18. Hosted by the Board for Certification of Genealogists.
  • Social History Websites That Bring Your Ancestor's Story to Life by Gena Philibert-Ortega. October 19.
  • Flip for Flickr - Share, Store and Save Your Family Photos by Maureen Taylor. October 26.
  • Analysis and Correlation - Two Keys to Sound Conclusions by Chris Staats. November 2.
  • Publishing a Genealogy E-Book by Thomas MacEntee. November 9.
  • Dating Family Photographs by Jane Neff Rollins. November 16.
  • Nature & Nurture - Family History for Adoptees by Janet Hovorka and Amy Slade. November 18.
  • Multi-Media Story Telling by Devin Ashby. November 30.
  • Becoming a Genealogy Detective by Sharon Atkins. December 7.
  • From the Heartland - Utilizing Online Resources in Midwest Research by Luana Darby. December 14.
  • Tracing Your European Ancestors by Julie Goucher. December 16.
  • An Introduction to BillionGraves by Garth Fitzner. December 21.

Click here to register.

Print the 2016 webinar brochure here.

See you online!


Need Help with your DNA Matches?

"With over 2.5 million people in the possession of a DNA test, and most with match lists in the thousands, many are wondering how to keep track of all this data and apply it to their family history." 

My thoughts exactly Diahan Southard. That is how she introduced one of her two brand new Quick Reference PDF guides. Having now tested myself, my father, my father-in-law, two grandfathers, and one grandmother, I'm starting to feel a little overwhelmed both with my match lists and with knowing how to effectively take the next step. That's why I'm excited for these two new guides.

Organizing Your DNA MatchesOrganize Your DNA Matches - A Companion Guide - 5.95 (instant download delivery)

With over 2.5 million people in the possession of a DNA test, and most with match lists in the thousands, many are wondering how to keep track of all this data and apply it to their family history. This guide provides the foundation for managing DNA matches and correspondence, and will help budding genetic genealogists:
  • Centralize their point of contact with their matches from multiple testing companies
  • Familiarize them with Google Forms for tracking information, including providing a link to a free bonus form template
  • Provide a brief overview of how to use the power of Google Earth in their genetic genealogy
  • Provide an introduction to spreadsheets
  • Review valuable third party tools and their contributions to the organizing effort

4 pages | PDF edition

Buybutton-144

DNA Next StepsNext Steps - Working with your autosomal DNA matches - 5.95 (instant download delivery) 

Many genealogists have heard about the power of DNA testing in genealogy and have dabbled in their own DNA test results. This guide outlines what to do next to maximize the power of DNA testing in genealogy. This guide provides instruction on:
  • How to leverage the power of known relatives who have tested
  • Gain a basic understanding of chromosome browsers and their role in the search process
  • Access to a free bonus template for evaluating the genealogical relationship of a match in relationship to the predicted genetic relationship
  • A methodology for converting the unknown relatives on the match list into known relatives
With this guide in hand, genealogists will be prepared to take their DNA testing experience to the next level and make new discoveries about their ancestors and heritage.
 
4 pages | PDF edition
 
Buybutton-144
 
More DNA guidance
 
When you need a little more help with your genetic genealogy, we have everything you'll need:
 

It's Not All Online: Researching in Archives - new LegacyQuickGuide now available

Legacy QuickGuidesTM have quickly become one of the more popular resources for genealogists. Each guide contains four (sometimes five, sometimes more) pages of valuable information covering a variety of genealogy research topics, dozens of clickable links, and are written by genealogists and family historians who are experts in the subject areas. We've added a brand new Legacy QuickGuide: It's Not All Online: Researching in Archives by Melissa Barker. Now choose from 96 Legacy QuickGuides!

It's Not All OnlineIt's Not All Online: Researching in Archives by Melissa Barker - $2.95  

As genealogists, we are living in a time when there are huge amounts of genealogy records being put online on a daily basis. We can do research in the comfort of our own homes with our pajamas and fuzzy slippers until 3 o’clock in the morning if we want. The truth is: It’s Not All Online! Unfortunately, many in the genealogy community have been lulled into thinking that everything is indeed online. That thinking must change and genealogists need to explore a variety of archives and repositories.

The It’s Not All Online: Researching in Archives Legacy QuickGuide™ contains useful information including how to find an archive and prepare for a visit, a list of record types and tips on research strategy, tips on making records requests, and more. Also included are links to websites and resources covering many archives and repositories for genealogical research. This handy 5-page PDF guide can be used on your computer or mobile device for anytime access.
 
Buybutton-144 

Now choose from 96!

Purchase for just $2.95

Buybutton-144

United States - State Guides

United States - other Guides

Canada

United Kingdom

Europe

Religion

General