Register for Webinar Wednesday - Migration Patterns East of the Mississippi Prior to 1860 by Mary Hill

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Why did people migrate from one location to another? What routes did they follow, and how can identifying migration trails help you find your ancestors? Learn from maps and historical details how to follow the trail of your ancestors.

Join us and Mary Hill for the live webinar Wednesday, May 27, 2015 at 2pm Eastern U.S. Register today to reserve your virtual seat. Registration is free but space is limited to the first 1,000 people to join that day. Before joining, please visit www.java.com to ensure you have the latest version of Java which our webinar software requires. When you join, if you receive a message that the webinar is full, you know we've reached the 1,000 limit, so we invite you to view the recording which should be published to the webinar archives within an hour or two of the event's conclusion.

Download the syllabus

In preparation for the webinar, download the supplemental syllabus materials here. The syllabus is available for annual or monthly webinar subscribers. Log in here or subscribe here.

Registerbut

Or register for multiple webinars at once by clicking here.

Not sure if you already registered?

On the Upcoming Webinars tab, login to view the webinars you are already signed up for (available for annual or monthly webinar subscribers).

Test Your Webinar Connection

To ensure that your webinar connection is ready to go, click here.

Can't make it to the live event?

No worries. Its recording will be available for a limited time. Webinar Subscribers have unlimited access to all webinar recordings for the duration of their membership.

About the presenter

Presenter-8636Mary E.V. Hill, MLS, AG ® (Mid-Atlantic States); worked as reference librarian at BYU from 1989-1992, as genealogy instructor at BYU from 1992-1995, as Family History Library US/Canada Reference consultant from 1995-2006. She served on the UGA Board of Directors from 2006-2008 and as an LDS missionary at the Family History Library from 2006-2008. She is the author of Saga of a Southern Loyalist: William Riddle of Virginia and North Carolina, and Angel Children. She is a lecturer with emphasis on U.S. research methods and genealogical organization. Mary is a mother and grandmother.

View Mary's other webinars here.

Add it to your Google Calendar

With our Google Calendar button, you will never forget our upcoming webinars. Simply click the button to add it to your calendar. You can then optionally embed the webinar events (and even turn them on and off) into your own personal calendar. If you have already added the calendar, you do not have to do it again - the new webinar events will automatically appear.

Webinar time

The webinar will be live on Wednesday, May 27, 2015 at:

  • 2pm Eastern (U.S.)
  • 1pm Central
  • 12pm Mountain
  • 11am Pacific

Or use this Time Zone Converter.

Here's how to attend:

  1. Register at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com today. It's free!
  2. You will receive a confirmation email containing a link to the webinar.
  3. You will receive a reminder email both 1 day and 1 hour prior to the live webinar.
  4. Calculate your time zone by clicking here.
  5. Make sure you have the latest version of Java installed on your computer. Check at www.java.com.
  6. Check your GoToWebinar connection here.
  7. Click on the webinar link (found in confirmation and reminder emails) prior to the start of the webinar. Arrive early as the room size is limited to the first 1,000 arrivals that day.
  8. Listen via headset (USB headsets work best), your computer speakers, or by phone.

We look forward to seeing you all there!


FamilySearch Records Update: More than 2.9 million new records for Australia, Canada, Peru, and the United States

FamilySearch has added to its collections more than 2.9 million indexed records and images for Australia, Canada, Peru, and the United States. Notable collection updates include 643,899 images from the Peru, Áncash, Civil Registration, 1888–2005 collection; 608,881 images from the Peru, Junín, Civil Registration, 1881–2005 collection; and 531,346 images from the US, Illinois, Northern District Petitions for Naturalization, 1906–1994 collection. See the table below for the full list of updates. Search these diverse collections and more than 5.8 billion other records for free at FamilySearch.org.

Searchable historic records are made available on FamilySearch.org through the help of thousands of volunteers from around the world. These volunteers transcribe (index) information from digital copies of handwritten records to make them easily searchable online. More volunteers are needed (particularly those who can read foreign languages) to keep pace with the large number of digital images being published online at FamilySearch.org. Learn more about volunteering to help provide free access to the world’s historic genealogical records online at FamilySearch.org.

FamilySearch is the largest genealogy organization in the world. FamilySearch is a nonprofit, volunteer-driven organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch and its predecessors have been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. Patrons may access FamilySearch services and resources for free at FamilySearch.org or through more than 4,600 family history centers in 132 countries, including the main Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.

CollectionIndexed RecordsDigital ImagesComments
Australia, Tasmania, Government Gazette, 1833–1925 0 101,074 New browsable image collection.
Canada Passenger Lists, 1881–1922 0 2,111 Added images to an existing collection.
Canada, Newfoundland, Vital Statistics, 1753–1893 191,573 0 New indexed record collection.
Peru, Áncash, Civil Registration, 1888–2005 0 643,899 Added images to an existing collection.
Peru, Cusco, Civil Registration, 1889–1997 0 287,219 Added images to an existing collection.
Peru, Junín, Civil Registration, 1881–2005 0 608,881 Added images to an existing collection.
Peru, Puno, Civil Registration, 1890–2005 116,677 0 Added indexed records to an existing collection.
US, Illinois, Northern District Petitions for Naturalization, 1906–1994 0 531,346 Added images to an existing collection.
US, Indiana, Marriages, 1811–2007 0 0 Added images to an existing collection.
US, Michigan, Probate Records, 1797–1973 0 12,871 Added images to an existing collection.
US, Minnesota, County Birth Records, 1863–1983 0 9,777 Added images to an existing collection.
US, Minnesota, County Deaths, 1850–2001 0 367,790 New browsable image collection.
US, Missouri, Deaths, 1835–1976 0 13,734 New browsable image collection.
US, Utah Applications Indian War Service Medals, 1905–1912 0 7,861 New browsable image collection.
US, Utah, Salt Lake City Cemetery Records, 1847–1976 0 70,504 New browsable image collection.
US, Wisconsin, Milwaukee Petitions to Naturalization, 1848–1991 0 289 Added images to an existing collection.


Got Iowa Ancestors? We've got you covered - new BONUS webinar for subscribers

2015-05-14-blog

Dear Legacy Family Tree Webinar Subscribers - if you have Iowa ancestors, you'll enjoy this second webinar in our series on researching your Iowa ancestors.

Webinar Description:

This second Iowa webinar, by Ruby Coleman, presents information about the active projects on Iowa USGenWeb and the Iowa Heritage Digital Collections. Learn about the two historical societies in Iowa and their unique collections. Visit Iowa online and in person to learn about your ancestry.

How to view:

If you are an annual or monthly webinar subscriber, this webinar's recording is now available in the Webinar Library. Just head over to the library, login, and enjoy! 4 pages of supplemental syllabus materials also accompany this webinar.

Click here to watch Iowa: Finding Ancestral Records.

Click here to watch Iowa Ancestors in History, Geography and Genealogy.

If you are not yet a webinar subscriber...when you join as an annual or monthly subscriber you, too, will have access to these bonus members-only webinars. This is the 15th we've added since January. Take a look at all of these benefits:

  • Unlimited access to the entire Webinar Library (currently 239 classes to choose from)
  • Access to the instructors' handouts (currently 1,009 pages)
  • Access to the live webinars' chat logs
  • Chance for a bonus subscribers-only door prize during each live webinar
  • 5% off anything in the FamilyTreeWebinars.com store
  • See which live webinars you have registered for

For more information, or to subscribe, click here.

B_IOWA_RES-2New Book! Iowa Genealogical Research by Ruby Coleman

Ruby's new book - all 410 pages - is the perfect companion to her webinar recording. Each county is fully covered, plus holdings in libraries and courthouse records. There are hundreds of URLs. Some of the topics include Ethnic Settlements; Iowa's Large Repositories and Archives; Religious Records; Orphan Trains and City Directories.

Regular price - 22.95

Our price - 19.95

Webinar subscribers price - 18.96

Click here to purchase.

About the presenter

Ruby Coleman, who resides in North Platte, Nebraska, spends a good deal of her time doing genealogical research on her families in Nebraska and the plains states, and also professionally. She has lived in Colorado, Wyoming, South Dakota, Iowa, and Nebraska. She has written articles for AncestryHeritage QuestThe Genealogical HelperFamily Chronicle and Internet Genealogy. For thirteen years she wrote the column, "Heritage Lines" for the North Platte Telegraph, North Platte, NE. Her book, Iowa Genealogical Records was published in January of 2014. She lectures for the Family History Expo. Currently Coleman is Area 7 Representative for the Nebraska State Genealogical Society and a past president of the North Platte Genealogical Society. Using her knowledge of Nebraska and the plain states genealogy and history, plus genealogical methodology, Coleman writes, lectures and teaches genealogy. She is a member of the Association of Professional Genealogists as well as numerous local, state and national genealogical organizations. In 2011 she was named 2011 Nebraska Genealogist of the Year by the Nebraska Genealogical Society.

Click here for all of Ruby's webinars.


Martha Benschura: Enemy Alien - free webinar by Judy Russell now available for limited time

2015-05-20-blog

Wow. What an amazing and inspiring webinar today! Right - we wouldn't expect anything less than that from Judy Russell, but she really outdid herself today. Truly entertaining, educational, and inspiring! Its recording is now available to view for free at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com for a limited time. Lots of great comments:

  • Excellent! History, Resources, Humor and passion! Unbeatable combination! Thank you!
  • Outstanding ... Opens a whole new avenue for searching!
  • Today's webinar has given me a new direction for finding more information about my grandmother. Judy Russell is fabulous, and the handout is mind-boggling! Thank you so much.

View the Recording at FamilyTreeWebinars.com

If you could not make it to the live event or just want to watch it again, the 1 hour 26 minute recording of "Martha Benschura: Enemy Alien" is now available to view in our webinar library for free for a limited time. Or watch it at your convenience with an annual or monthly webinar membership.

Coupon code

Use webinar coupon code - alien10 - for 10% off anything at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com or www.LegacyFamilyTreeStore.com, valid through Monday, May 25, 2015.

Webinar Memberships/Subscriptions

Webinar Members get:

  • On-demand access to the entire webinar archives (now 238 classes, 348 hours of genealogy education)
  • On-demand access to the instructor handouts (now 1,009 pages)
  • On-demand access to the live webinars' chat logs
  • 5% off all products at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com (must be logged in at checkout)
  • Access to all future recordings for the duration of their membership
  • Chance for a members-only door prize during each live webinar
  • Access to register for bonus members-only webinars
  • Ability to view which webinars you are registered for

Introductory pricing:

  • Annual membership: $49.95/year (that's about the cost of 5 webinar CDs)
  • Monthly membership: $9.95/month

Click here to subscribe.

Register for our upcoming webinars (free)

  • Migration Patterns East of the Mississippi Prior to 1860 by Mary Hill. May 27.
  • Genealogy 101, a 3-Session Course in Beginning Genealogy - Part 3 by Peggy Clemens Lauritzen. June 3.
  • Tips for Planning a Successful Seminar by Jana Sloan Broglin. June 10.
  • 10 Tips for Using Legacy with Specialized Studies by Tessa Keough. June 12.
  • The Secret Lives of Women - Researching Female Ancestors Using the Sources They Left Behind by Gena Philibert-Ortega. July 1.
  • Pinning Your Family History by Thomas MacEntee. July 8.
  • Making a Federal Case Out of It by Judy Russell (bonus webinar for annual/monthly webinar subscribers only). July 10.
  • Researching with Karen! by Karen Clifford. July 15.
  • Have Swedish Roots and Don't Know How to Get Started? by Kathy Meade. July 22.
  • Storyboard Your Family History by Lisa Alzo. July 29.
  • Mending Broken Ties: Reconstructing Family Trees Sawed by Slavery by Melvin J. Collier. July 31.
  • What's in a Name? Trouble! by Ron Arons. August 5.
  • Power Platting - Technology Tools to Create Pictures from Property Descriptions by Chris Staats. August 12.
  • Discovering Your Kentucky Ancestors by Mark Lowe. August 19.
  • Digital Family Reunions by Devin Ashby. August 21.
  • German Names and Naming Patterns by Jim Beidler. August 26.
  • Break Down Brick Walls in Eastern European Research - Tips, Tools and Tricks by Lisa Alzo. September 2.
  • Research Your Swedish Ancestors in Living Color Using ArkivDigital Online by Kathy Meade. September 9.
  • Technology and Techniques for Differentiating Two People with the Same Name by Geoff Rasmussen. September 11.
  • Researching Your Dutch Ancestors by Yvette Hoitink. September 16.
  • Researching Your Ancestors in England and Wales by Kirsty Gray. September 23.
  • Maps Tell Some of the Story for the African-Ancestored Genealogist by Angela Walton-Raji. September 25.
  • Using Periodicals to Find Your Ancestors by Gena Philibert-Ortega. September 30.
  • Wearables and Genealogy - Wacky and Wild or Worth the Wait by Thomas MacEntee. October 7.
  • Colonial Immigration - The English Pioneers of Early America by Beth Foulk. October 14.
  • Billions of Records, Billions of Stories by Devin Ashby. October 16.
  • What Happened to the State of Frankland - Using Tennessee's Pre-Statehood Records by Mark Lowe. October 21.
  • Complex Evidence - What is It? How Does it Work? And Why Does it Matter? by Warren Bittner. October 28.
  • Researching with Karen! by Karen Clifford. November 4.
  • Organizing Your Genetic Genealogy by Diahan Southard. November 11.
  • Bringing it All Together and Leaving a Permanent Record by Tom Kemp. November 13.
  • Mapping Madness by Ron Arons. November 18.
  • Stories in Stone - Cemetery Research by Gail Blankenau. December 2.
  • Thinking about Becoming an Accredited Genealogist? by Apryl Cox and Kelly Summers. December 9.
  • Pointing Fingers at Ancestors' Siblings - Breaking Down Brick Walls with Collateral Research by Marian Pierre-Louis. December 16.

Click here to register. Or click here register for multiple webinars at the same time.

Print the 2015 webinar brochure here.

See you online!


New Legacy QuickTip Video - How to Create a List of "Who Lived Where"

We have another great Legacy QuickTip Video for you today! Learn:

  • How to create a list of everyone who lived in a specific location.

This is helpful when you are visiting a town, or looking in the records of a place, and need to know which of your ancestors lived there. Makes it easier to know who you could look for in the records.

This QuickTip was presented live during the after-webinar party of last week's Genealogy 101, a 3-Session Course in Beginning Genealogy, Part 2 by Peggy Laurizten.

Click here for the video.

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Click here for more Legacy QuickTip videos.


Ancestor's Picture in the Newspapers? Three Steps to an Amazing Photograph

I found a genealogy gold mine in the newspaper this week. And then with a little creativity and a couple of good contacts, I doubled my findings.

First, I used my favorite newspaper subscription site, GenealogyBank.com, and found an article about an ancestor I have been researching. The article had lots of goodies for me, but none greater than the photographs of Cullen Brown, his sister Fannie Brown, and his wife Helen Goshaw. Here's their three pictures in the context of the February 19, 1905 edition of The Duluth News Tribune.

Genbank1

I've been researching Helen Goshaw as a potential main character for my next edition of Legacy Unlocked! and never imagined I'd find her photograph. Here's a zoomed-in and cropped image of Helen:

1

Then I started to get greedy. Or maybe creative is a better word. While the photograph find was priceless, I wondered if I could get a better copy of it. Without GenealogyBank.com, I never would have found the picture, and so thanks again to them! But I wanted better quality. That's when I contacted Robert of the Twin Cities Legacy User Group. I asked if he would visit the Minnesota Historical Society (such an amazing place!), locate the newspaper (either the original or the microfilm edition), and snap a digital image of it for me. To my surprise, he responded to my email within minutes (thanks again Robert!) and said he would try to fulfill my request the next day when he was scheduled to be at their library.

The following day he emailed me the digital photographs he took of the microfilmed edition of the Duluth News Tribune. Look at Helen's picture:

2

Amazing!

Most people would be thankful enough already, but I had one more idea. I contacted my friend, Miles Abernathy of 399retouch.com and asked if he could do anything more with Helen's photograph. Again - minutes later I received a response (talk about instant genealogical gratification!) that he would see what he could do. Two days later he sent this:

3

Stunning, isn't it!

I guess the only thing better would be to find the original photograph in one of their descendant's photo albums. Yet without it, I am very pleased with what I have found. Thanks again to GenealogyBank.com, Robert, and to 399retouch.com. And thanks to Cullen and Helen for sneaking out of the house (and out of the county) to get married back in 1905. And thanks to Cullen's sister for doing the exact same thing just months earlier. It made for a story good enough to get their pictures in the newspaper! If any of my kids try this, they'll find their picture in the Obituaries.

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Register for Webinar Wednesday - Martha Benshura: Enemy Alien by Judy Russell

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Not all our ancestors were naturalized. The ones who didn't become citizens suddenly became suspect when war divided their native countries from their new residences, creating the kinds of records genealogists love.

Join us and Judy Russell for the live webinar Wednesday, May 20, 2015 at 2pm Eastern U.S. Register today to reserve your virtual seat. Registration is free but space is limited to the first 1,000 people to join that day. Before joining, please visit www.java.com to ensure you have the latest version of Java which our webinar software requires. When you join, if you receive a message that the webinar is full, you know we've reached the 1,000 limit, so we invite you to view the recording which should be published to the webinar archives within an hour or two of the event's conclusion.

Download the syllabus

In preparation for the webinar, download the supplemental syllabus materials here (23 pages!). The syllabus is available for annual or monthly webinar subscribers. Log in here or subscribe here.

Registerbut

Or register for multiple webinars at once by clicking here.

Not sure if you already registered?

On the Upcoming Webinars tab, login to view the webinars you are already signed up for (available for annual or monthly webinar subscribers).

Test Your Webinar Connection

To ensure that your webinar connection is ready to go, click here.

Can't make it to the live event?

No worries. Its recording will be available for a limited time. Webinar Subscribers have unlimited access to all webinar recordings for the duration of their membership.

About the presenter

Presenter-8755A genealogist with a law degree, Judy G. Russell is a lecturer, educator and writer who enjoys helping others understand a wide variety of genealogical issues, including the interplay between genealogy and the law. She has a bachelor’s degree in political science and journalism from George Washington University in Washington, D.C. and a law degree from Rutgers School of Law-Newark, and holds Certified Genealogist and Certified Genealogical Lecturer credentials from the Board for Certification of Genealogists where she serves as a member of the Board of Trustees. She has worked as a newspaper reporter, trade association writer, legal investigator, defense attorney, federal prosecutor, law editor and, for more than 20 years, Judy has been an adjunct member of the faculty at Rutgers Law School. Judy is a Colorado native with roots deep in the American south on her mother’s side and entirely in Germany on her father’s side. Visit her website atwww.legalgenealogist.com.

View Judy's other webinars here.

Add it to your Google Calendar

With our Google Calendar button, you will never forget our upcoming webinars. Simply click the button to add it to your calendar. You can then optionally embed the webinar events (and even turn them on and off) into your own personal calendar. If you have already added the calendar, you do not have to do it again - the new webinar events will automatically appear.

Webinar time

The webinar will be live on Wednesday, May 20, 2015 at:

  • 2pm Eastern (U.S.)
  • 1pm Central
  • 12pm Mountain
  • 11am Pacific

Or use this Time Zone Converter.

Here's how to attend:

  1. Register at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com today. It's free!
  2. You will receive a confirmation email containing a link to the webinar.
  3. You will receive a reminder email both 1 day and 1 hour prior to the live webinar.
  4. Calculate your time zone by clicking here.
  5. Make sure you have the latest version of Java installed on your computer. Check at www.java.com.
  6. Check your GoToWebinar connection here.
  7. Click on the webinar link (found in confirmation and reminder emails) prior to the start of the webinar. Arrive early as the room size is limited to the first 1,000 arrivals that day.
  8. Listen via headset (USB headsets work best), your computer speakers, or by phone.

We look forward to seeing you all there!


Looking Past Land and Probate Records

by Marian Pierre-Louis

Following my recent blog post Bring Down Those Brick Walls! I received this response from Elizabeth:

"There has been a lot of discussion lately about land and probate use. The conversations make the assumption that everyone either owned land or had a will. This is not the case for most people who lived in non-rural areas. My family members have lived in the New York City area for more than a few generations. They were always tenants. The first real-property on both sides of the family was purchased by my parents in the 1950s and they were the first to have wills. So my brick walls will not benefit from this discussion. Believe me I have looked. How about some suggestions for the rest of us?"

Let's see if we can come up with some suggestions for Elizabeth.

FamilySearch-1865NYScensus-crop

New York State Census, 1865 from FamilySearch.org

Before we start, I need to point out that I don't have two very important pieces of information: the time period in which Elizabeth is having trouble or the specific county in New York City where her ancestors lived. We also need to mention that New York nearly invented the phrase "Brick Wall!" New York suffers from a dearth of extant records making it one of the hardest states to research in.

New York City is made up of five boroughs in five separate counties: Bronx in Bronx County, Brooklyn in Kings County, Manhattan in New York County, Queens in Queens County and Staten Island in Richmond County. Research strategies may vary depending on where your ancestors lived.

Since we are talking about bringing down brick walls I'm making the assumption that research has already been done on low hanging fruit such as US Federal census records and vital records. One place you might want to start, if you haven't already are the New York State Census records. These are available for free on FamilySearch.org for the years 1855, 1865, 1875, 1892, 1905, 1915, and 1925.

The census records list the individual names of family members, place of birth, ages and occupations along with some other details. The 1905, 1915 and 1925 census even list the street address. (Please note that some of the record images are viewable on FamilySearch.org while others require a subscription to Ancestry.com to view the original image.) If your ancestors are New York-born, the 1855, 1865 and 1875 censuses will tell you what county they were born in. That may be critical in guiding you to new locations to focus your research.

When dealing with tenants, non-land owners, I would head straight for city directories. On Ancestry.com I found a database called New York City City Directories that starts as early as 1836 and as late as 1947. Unfortunately, Ancestry doesn't list which specific years are covered in the database so don't consider those years as hard and fast. If you can find your ancestor in a city directory then you can locate their neighborhood. Armed with information about their neighborhood you can try to establish which place of worship they frequented. Start by selecting churches or temples within two square miles of your ancestors' homes. If you can't find the records online then contact the churches or temples directly asking for information about your ancestors.

Another wonderful resource for New York City ancestry is the Italian Genealogical Group website. Despite the title's focus on Italian records they actually have transcribed many New York City records, regardless of ethnicity. Be sure to search their databases for information on your ancestors.

If you still haven't found anything new about your ancestors then it is time to seek some research guidance help. Right from within the Legacy Family Tree software you get can specific suggestions about your ancestors. The software will suggest specific record groups as well as county histories and collections to search.

Another resource you should try if you haven't already, is the Family Search Wiki. This resource has extensive information on New York City research. Wherever possible it links directly to the record groups mentioned.

Thomas MacEntee's webinar and Legacy QuickGuide provide many clues and strategies for researching your New York ancestors that you may not have thought of.

And lastly, you should definitely refer to the recently published New York Family History Research Guide and Gazetteer by the New York Genealogical and Biographical Society. This 840 page work provides a comprehensive look at New York records and resources.

In terms of specifically bringing down brick walls, an effective strategy is to seek examples by others who have already solved challenging research problems in the same location where you are having trouble. The two main publications I would focus on are the National Genealogical Society Quarterly and the New York Genealogical and Biographical Record. Search these publications for example articles that cover the same county where your ancestors lived. Learn how the authors solved their problems and look at the footnotes to see what records they used.

African American research, regardless of location, can be some of the toughest research to unravel. For this reason well-documented narratives can provide a great source of inspiration or information regardless of your race. Check out a book like Black Gotham by Carla Peterson and pay close attention to the records she used to document her ancestors.

Finally, you will likely have to dip into manuscripts and special collections to find information about particularly stubborn ancestors. Luckily you have one of the most incredible resources right in your local area - the New York Public Library. Start online by reviewing the Research section of their website. You will find links to special collections and manuscripts as well as online articles, databases and digital collections. When searching for your ancestors in special collections expand your search beyond their names to include their neighborhood, their churches and their ethnicity. While your ancestors are likely not indexed by name, this broader search will bring you to information about their community.

Hopefully this article has provided you will some new suggestions for researching challenging New York City ancestors. If not, then I would suggest joining a local genealogical or historical society in your county of interest. The New York Genealogical and Biographical Society provides and extensive list of organizations on their website.

If anyone else has any suggestions for Elizabeth, please leave them in the comments. Good luck and let us know if you make any progress!

Marian Pierre-Louis is the Social Media Marketing Manager for Legacy Family Tree. She is also the host of The Genealogy Professional podcast. Check out her webinars in the Legacy library.


New Legacy QuickTip Video - How to Create a Birthday Reminder

Never forget those important dates again!

We have another great Legacy QuickTip Video for you today! Learn:

  • How to create a birthday, anniversary, or death date reminder in Legacy Family Tree.

This QuickTip was presented live during the after-webinar party of last week's Genealogy 101, a 3-Session Course in Beginning Genealogy, Part 2 by Peggy Laurizten.

Click here for the video.

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Click here for more Legacy QuickTip videos.


New England Deeds and Probate by Marian Pierre-Louis - brand new BONUS webinar for subscribers

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Are you stuck on an ancestor in New England (Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, Vermont)? As Marian Pierre-Louis states in her new webinar, "New England Deeds and Probate," the answer you are looking for may be hiding in deeds or probate records.

Did you know that all the members of a family may be named in an old deed? Have you ever tried to get a close-up view of what your ancestors wore and the tools they used from an estate inventory? Learn how to use the records in New England Registry of Deeds and Probate Court to further your genealogical research. Deed and probate records can help resolve brick walls as well add breadth to your ancestor’s personal story.

How to view:

If you are an annual or monthly webinar subscriber, this webinar's recording is now available in the Webinar Library. Just head over to the library, login, and enjoy!

Click here to watch the webinar.

If you are not yet a webinar subscriber...when you join as an annual or monthly subscriber you, too, will have access to these bonus members-only webinars. This is the 14th we've added since January. Take a look at all of these benefits:

  • Unlimited access to the entire Webinar Library (currently 237 classes to choose from)
  • Access to the instructors' handouts (currently 1,002 pages)
  • Access to the live webinars' chat logs
  • Chance for a bonus subscribers-only door prize during each live webinar
  • 5% off anything in the FamilyTreeWebinars.com store
  • See which live webinars you have registered for

For more information, or to subscribe, click here.

About the presenter

Presenter-1417732007Marian Pierre-Louis is a genealogical writer and speaker who specializes in southern New England research (Connecticut, Rhode Island, and Massachusetts). Born and raised in Connecticut, she has lived in Massachusetts for almost 20 years. Marian has three generations of recent family ties to Rhode Island and also links to some very old Rhode Island lines.  As a result, these three states have become the focus of her research activity. Unlike most genealogists, Marian is spoiled to spend most of her time working with original records.  You will most often find her researching at a town hall, registry of deeds, probate court or the local cemetery. It’s a rare day that Marian has to sit in front of a microfilm reader.

Marian is actively engaged in social media.  You can find her starting conversations on Facebook, Twitter and Google+. She frequently speaks on New England topics including house history research, social media, African American research and a broad range of genealogical topics. She is the author of several blogs including: Marian's Roots & Rambles and The New England House Historian. She is the host of the new Internet radio show, Fieldstone Common. Listen to her each Thursday at FieldstoneCommon.

Her website is www.FieldstoneHistoricResearch.com.

Click here for all of Marian's webinars.