Five-part New York Webinar Series Now Available

Five-part New York Webinar Series Now Available with Jane E. Wilcox

Are you one of many Americans with New York ancestry? New York has a rich variety of early settlers from the New Netherland Dutch, to Quakers to the English Puritans. As a major thoroughfare of migration westward, many of our ancestors resided in the state for a brief stop or a generation or two. In this new series, New York expert Jane Wilcox takes us on a five-part journey to discover the resources available for uncovering our New York state ancestry.

The 5-class series - New York Genealogy Research

We're working hard to give our webinar subscribers the educational classes they need to maximize their genealogical research!

All five of these new classes are bonus classes in the webinar library. The webinar previews are always free for non-members to watch.

New to webinars and online education? Learn more about the online genealogy education classes at Legacy Family Tree Webinars.

The individual classes

Up The North River: An Overview of Pre-1800 Hudson Valley Ethnic Groups and Religions

The Hudson (North) River valley was an ethnic and religious melting pot long before the late nineteenth century immigrant influx. Find out who was in New York in the beginning. You will be surprised! 

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Plus 10 pages of supplemental syllabus materials.

The New York Gateway: Immigration, Emigration and Migration

The New York Gateway: Immigration, Emigration and Migration Records Alternates: New York has been the heart of U.S. immigration since the 1600s. Discover the origins of key immigrant and emigrant groups and settlers and where they went. Learn the New York migration routes and transportation modes that your New York ancestors may have taken. Putting your ancestors in the context of their times is key for researching them. Some research resources and ideas are featured. 

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Plus 8 pages of supplemental syllabus materials.

Researching Hudson Valley Palatine Tenant Farmers: Overlooked Resources

Documents for New York manors and their Palatine tenants in the Hudson Valley have survived. Learn how and where to look for your German tenant ancestors in these and other records, such as court and tax records.  Finding aids for collections are featured as well. See examples for using the records in your research. What you learn here can be applied to any ancestor in the Hudson Valley -- not just Palatines.

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Plus 6 pages of supplemental syllabus materials.

A Tour of New York State Research Repositories: The Best - Part 1

Explore the unique research resources and collections that are held by libraries, county archives, town historians, and historical and genealogical societies in New York State (not including Long Island, NYC and Albany). Among those featured are the Folklife Center at the Crandall Public Library in Glens Falls, Warren County; the Genessee County History Department in Batavia; the Rhinebeck Town Historian at the Starr Library in Rhinebeck, Dutchess County; the Western New York Genealogical Society at the Buffalo and Erie County Public Library in Buffalo; and the Onondaga County Public Library Local History and Genealogy Department in Syracuse. You'll learn research ideas for any repository as well.

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Plus 9 pages of supplemental syllabus materials.

A Tour of New York State Research Repositories: The Best - Part 2

Continue to explore the unique New York State research resources and collections focusing on universities, ethnic societies, museums, military repositories, online holdings, and more (not including Long Island, NYC and Albany). Among those featured are Cornell University's Division of Rare and Special Collections in Ithaca, Tompkins County; the Seneca-Iroquois National Museum in Salamanca, Cattaraugus County; the Erie Canal Museum in Syracuse, Onondaga County; the Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library in Hyde Park, Dutchess County; the New York State Military Museum and Veterans Research Center in Saratoga Springs, Saratoga County and ArchiveGrid. You'll learn research ideas for any repository as well.  

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Plus 8 pages of supplemental syllabus materials.


Jane E. WilcoxJane E. Wilcox

Jane E. Wilcox is a contributing editor of the New York Genealogical & Biographical Record and serves on the New York State Archives Advisory Committee. She speaks at national genealogy conferences and institutes and hosts The Forget-Me-Not Hour podcast twice a month at www.BlogTalkRadio.com/JaneEWilcox. With her company, Forget-Me-Not Ancestry, in Kingston, NY, Jane specializes in colonial and early national New York and area research. She serves on the New York Genealogical & Biographical Society’s New York Family History Advisory Committee.

Not a member yet?

Legacy Family Tree Webinars provides genealogy education where-you-are through live and recorded online webinars and videos. Learn from the best instructors in genealogy including Thomas MacEntee, Judy Russell, J. Mark Lowe, Lisa Louise Cooke, Megan Smolenyak, Tom Jones, and many more. Learn at your convenience. On-demand classes are available 24 hours a day! All you need is a computer or mobile device with an Internet connection.

Subscribe today and get access to this BONUS members-only webinar AND all of this:

  • All 450 classes in the library (625 hours of quality genealogy education)
  • 2,067 pages of instructors' handouts
  • Chat logs from the live webinars
  • Additional 5% off anything at FamilyTreeWebinars.com
  • Chance for a bonus subscribers-only door prize during each live webinar
  • Additional members-only webinars

It's just $49.95/year or $9.95/month.

Subscribe


How to Crop, Resize, and Highlight Census Images for Genealogical Use

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Legacy user, Scott Langworthy, has written up some instructions for manipulating census images to make them easier to read. He has kindly offered to share them here with you. Before downloading the document, here is a summary of how this can benefit genealogists.

IrfanView is a Free Photo Viewer which has many surprising capabilities, some of which I use all the time in my genealogical research and using Legacy Family Tree software.

When IrfanView, I can take a downloaded Census Image from Ancestry (for example), and do the following as needed to provide me with a finished Jpg photo.

  • I can Crop the excess part of the image. Getting rid of black or white that is surrounding the image we want to preserve.
  • I can use the Color Corrections Menu off of the Image Menu, to adjust the Gamma, and Contrast, to eliminate some of the noise, or to darken, or to lighten the image making it easier to see and interpret.
  • I can use a little trick in that same menu, if I first highlight the area where I want a nice Highlight Yellow area, and then use the BLUE Color Button and shift it down all the way to -255 thereby turning the selection in question, YELLOW and yet still see the underlying Black Text.
  • I can use the Resize menu off of the Image menu, to resize the full size image, in order to reduce the size in MB, to something smaller, but yet still zoomable to read details. This helps keep File sizes down, which can make the Legacy Database Images unwieldy.

There are other things this free viewer program can do, but this alone makes my simple editing work fast and allows for fast flow in getting the info, and moving on to the next image.

Click here to download the step-by-step, illustrated instructions.

Thanks Scott!


FamilySearch Records Update: New records for Canada, England, Japan, New Zealand, Philippines, Sweden, and United States

New searchable, indexed records were just published for 8 different countries around the world. If you're looking for historic records in Canada, England, Japan, New Zealand, the Philippines, Sweden, Scotland or the United States perhaps one of these collection has the ancestor you are looking for. Search these free records and more at FamilySearch.org by clicking on the links in the interactive table below.

Collection

Indexed Records

Digital Images

Comments

Ontario District Marriage Registers 1801-1858

32465

0

Added indexed records to an existing collection

Ontario County Marriage Registers 1858-1869

57469

0

Added indexed records to an existing collection

England Bristol Non-Conformist Church Records 1777-1936

160422

23603

New indexed records and images collection

England Cornwall Parish Registers 1538-2010

160890

0

Added indexed records to an existing collection

England Durham Diocese Marriage Bonds & Allegations 1692-1900

18587

0

Added indexed records to an existing collection

England Manchester Parish Registers 1603-1910

13909

0

Added indexed records to an existing collection

England Devon and Cornwall Marriages 1660-1912

540

4692

New indexed records and images collection

England Warwickshire Parish Registers 1535-1984

125305

0

Added indexed records to an existing collection

Japan Passenger Lists 1893-1941

117957

0

Added indexed records to an existing collection

New Zealand Archives New Zealand Passenger Lists 1839-1973

93166

0

Added indexed records to an existing collection

BillionGraves Index

266980

266980

Added indexed records and images to an existing collection

Philippines Civil Registration (National) 1945-1984

154620

0

Added indexed records to an existing collection

Sweden Kronoberg Church Records 1589-1921; index 1612-1860

0

4277

Added images to an existing collection

Sweden Norrbotten Church Records 1612-1923; index 1658-1860

0

2057

Added images to an existing collection

Sweden Göteborg och Bohus Church Records 1577-1932; index 1659-1860

0

676

Added images to an existing collection

Sweden Östergötland Church Records 1555-1911; index 1616-1860

0

2625

Added images to an existing collection

Sweden Västmanland Church Records 1538-1901; index 1622-1860

0

3797

Added images to an existing collection

Sweden Värmland Church Records 1509-1925; index 1640-1860

0

2765

Added images to an existing collection

Sweden Uppsala Church Records 1308-1901; index 1613-1860

0

3066

Added images to an existing collection

Sweden Skaraborg Church Records 1612-1921; index 1625-1860

0

28461

Added images to an existing collection

Scotland Church Records and Kirk Session Records 1658-1919

302484

0

New indexed records collection

North Carolina Estate Files 1663-1979

37456

0

Added indexed records to an existing collection

Ohio Crawford County Obituaries 1860-2004

191219

0

Added indexed records to an existing collection

Louisiana First Registration Draft Cards compiled 1940-1945

498

0

Added indexed records to an existing collection

West Virginia Naturalization Records 1814-1991

10

0

Added indexed records to an existing collection

Louisiana Parish Marriages 1837-1957

23735

0

Added indexed records to an existing collection

 

Searchable historic records are made available on FamilySearch.org through the help of thousands of volunteers from around the world. These volunteers transcribe (index) information from digital copies of handwritten records to make them easily searchable online. More volunteers are needed (particularly those who can read foreign languages) to keep pace with the large number of digital images being published online at FamilySearch.org. Learn more about volunteering to help provide free access to the world's historic genealogical records online at FamilySearch.org/indexing.


2017 Legacy Family Tree Webinar Series announced

RegistrationOpen

Millennia Corporation and FamilyTreeWebinars.com are pleased to announce that registration is now open for its 2017 Legacy Family Tree Webinar Series. Choose from 76 classes from genealogy's leading educators on topics ranging from genealogy technology, to DNA, to in-depth research methodologies.

And not to name-drop, but our live series will welcome for the first time genealogy celebrities like Blaine Bettinger of theGeneticGenealogist.com, Ireland's John Grenham, and Craig Scott of HeritageBooks.com; major genealogy organizations like WikiTree, FamilySearch, and Evidentia; and will explore for the first time countries such as Mexico, Denmark and Norway. Also learn about DNA, software, photography, Quakers, virtual family reunions, the Genealogical Proof Standard and so much more.

We are also proud to once again host the monthly webinar series for the Board for Certification of Genealogists where we will learn from the likes of Tom Jones, David Ouimette, LaBrenda Garrett-Nelson and nine other board-certified genealogists.

Sign up (it's FREE!) for one or for all of them today and you will receive a reminder email both one day and one hour prior to the live event.

Click here to register.

Click here to register for multiple webinars at once.

Webinar Brochure

Print the webinar brochure to share with your friends, genealogy society, or Family History Center.

FamilyTreeWebinars.com memberships

All live webinars are free and their recordings are free to watch for the first 7 days. With a webinar subscription you also get all of this AND these additional benefits:

  • Access to 1) all the existing 445 classes in the library (620 hours of quality genealogy education), 2) plus the 76 webinars that will be added during the 2017 season, 3) plus any additional bonus subscribers-only webinars (107 of these so far) - all available for the duration of your membership
  • Access to all 2,036 pages of instructors' handouts plus the new handouts of the 2017 season
  • Chat logs from the live webinars
  • Additional 5% off anything at FamilyTreeWebinars.com
  • Chance for a bonus subscribers-only door prize during each live webinar
  • Additional members-only BONUS webinars
  • Playlist, resume watching, and jump-to features

It's just $49.95/year ($44.95 through 12/31/16).

Subscribe

Nowhere else - on land, at sea, or online - will you find genealogy courses as comprehensive, diverse, or as numerous as you will find at FamilyTreeWebinars.com.

Add it to your Google Calendar

Click here to add the Legacy Family Tree Webinar Series to your Google Calendar.

Google

2017 Speakers

Lots of brand new speakers join many of your favorites for 2017. One of them may be the one to help you break down your genealogical brick wall! Don't miss even one week!

  2017

2017 Schedule

January 2017

  • Strategies to Find the Most Challenging Ancestors with Autosomal DNA Data by James M. Baker, PhD, CG. 1/4
  • Tips and Tricks to Organizing Your Genealogy by Shannon Combs-Bennett . 1/11
  • Legacy Family Tree for Complete Beginners by Geoff Rasmussen. 1/13
  • Writing Up Your Research by Michael J. Leclerc, CG. 1/17 (BCG)
  • Create a Free Google Earth Historic Map Collection for Your Research by Lisa Louise Cooke. 1/18
  • Playing Nice In The Genealogy Sandbox by Thomas MacEntee. 1/25

February 2017

  • Photography for Genealogy by Nicka Smith. 2/1
  • The "WHO" of Genetic Genealogy by Blaine Bettinger. 2/8
  • Deciphering German Script by Gail Blankenau. 2/10
  • Be Your Own Digital Archivist: Preserve Your Research by Cyndi Ingle. 2/15
  • Weaving DNA Test Results into a Proof Argument by Karen Stanbary, CG. 2/21 (BCG)
  • Finding Missing Persons With DNA Testing by Diahan Southard. 2/22

March 2017

  • Apprentices, Indentured Servants, and Redemptioners - White Slavery in America by Peggy Clemens Lauritzen, AG. 3/1
  • 50 Websites Every Genealogist Should Know by Gena Philibert-Ortega. 3/8
  • Home on the Range: Kansas Research Tips by Cari Taplin, CG. 3/10
  • Why are Irish records so weird? by John Grenham. 3/15
  • Are You My Grandpa? Men of the Same Name by Rebecca Whitman Koford, CG. 3/21 (BCG)
  • Picture This: Images You Can Freely Use by Judy G. Russell, JD, CG, CGL . 3/22
  • Introduction to Quaker Genealogy Research by Craig Scott. 3/29

April 2017

  • Preserve, Share, and Search Your Digital Pictures with Google Photos by Geoff Rasmussen. 4/5
  • Your Whiteboard in the Cloud: Trello for Genealogists by Lisa Alzo. 4/12
  • Complete Photo Restoration in 4 Easy Steps by Eric Basir. 4/14
  • The Genealogy in Government Documents by Rick Sayre, CG, CGL, FUGA. 4/18 (BCG)
  • Neighborhood Reconstruction: Effective Use of Land Records by Mary Hill, AG . 4/19
  • Finding and Using Land Ownership Maps by Rick Sayre, CG, CGL, FUGA. 4/26
  • Researching Criminal Records by Ron Arons. 4/28

May 2017

  • Take Me Back to Where I Belong: Transportation Records of the Freedmen’s Bureau by Angela Walton-Raji. 5/3
  • Introduction to Danish Genealogy by Fritz Juengling. 5/10
  • New York City and State Governmental Vital Records by Jane Wilcox. 5/12
  • MAXY DNA: Correlating mt-at-X-Y DNA with the GPS by Debbie Parker Wayne, CG, CGL. 5/16 (BCG)
  • Remember Me: Lifestreaming and the Modern Genealogist by Thomas MacEntee. 5/17
  • WikiTree: Free for All without a Free-for-All by Eowyn Langholf. 5/24
  • The Great War: Researching Your World War I Ancestors by Michael L. Strauss, AG. 5/31

June 2017

  • Researching Your Minnesota Ancestors by Paula Stuart-Warren, CG, FMGS, FUGA. 6/7
  • The Increasing Need for Foreign Language Indexing by Devin Ashby. 6/9
  • How Harry Potter Can Teach You About DNA by Blaine Bettinger. 6/14
  • What Now? Your Next Steps with Autosomal DNA Testing by Diahan Southard. 6/16
  • Beating the Bushes: Using the GPS to Find Jacob Bush's Father by Elissa Scalise Powell, CG, CGL. 6/20 (BCG)
  • Virtual Family Reunions: Super Easy, Super Fun by Pat Richley. 6/21
  • Canada's Top 10 by Kathryn Lake Hogan. 6/28

Register

July 2017

  • Censational Census Strategies by Mary Roddy. 7/5
  • Google Books: the tool you should use every day! by Lisa Louise Cooke. 7/12
  • Tips for Snapping Pics: How to Take Perfect Family Photographs by Jared Hodges. 7/14
  • Analyzing Documents Sparks Ideas for Further Research by Angela Packer McGhie, CG. 7/18 (BCG)
  • The Firelands, The Connecticut Western Reserve, and the Ohio Territory by Peggy Clemens Lauritzen, AG. 7/19
  • Family History Adhesive: The Science of Why History Binds Families and the Simple Tech of How to Do It by Janet Hovorka. 7/26

August 2017

  • Tracing Your West Country Ancestors by Kirsty Gray. 8/2
  • A Taxing Matter: Using Tax Lists in Genealogy by Judy G. Russell, JD, CG, CGL. 8/9
  • Using Pictures with Legacy Family Tree by Geoff Rasmussen. 8/11
  • Analyzing Probate Records of Slaveholders to Identify Enslaved Ancestors by LaBrenda Garrett-Nelson, JD, LLM, CG. 8/15 (BCG)
  • Finding Your Ancestors in German Directories by Ursula Krause. 8/16
  • How to do Mexican Research and Be Successful by Jonathan Walker. 8/23
  • Getting Started with Evidentia by Ed Thompson. 8/30

September 2017

  • Top Tech Tips by Geoff Rasmussen. 9/6
  • Finding Isaac Rogers by Nicka Smith. 9/13
  • The ABCs and 123s of Researching Your Ancestor's School Records by Melissa Barker. 9/15
  • When Does Newfound Evidence Overturn a Proved Conclusion? by Tom Jones. 9/19 (BCG)
  • Wolfram Alpha for Genealogists by Thomas MacEntee. 9/20
  • Quick Guide to Texas Research by Deena Coutant. 9/27

October 2017

  • No Easy Button: Using “Immersion Genealogy” to Understand Your Ancestors by Lisa Alzo. 10/4
  • Southern States Migration Patterns by Mary Hill, AG. 10/11
  • Is Your Society Growing? Social Media may be your saving grace by Pat Richley. 10/13
  • Databases, Search Engines, and the Genealogical Proof Standard by David Ouimette, CG. 10/17 (BCG)
  • The WPA: Sources for Your Genealogy by Gena Philibert-Ortega. 10/18
  • Midwestern & Plains States Level Census Records by Paula Stuart-Warren, CG, FMGS, FUGA. 10/25

November 2017

  • Is this the End? Taking Your German Brick Walls Down Piece by Piece by Ursula Krause and Luana Darby. 11/1
  • New York City Genealogical Research: Navigating Through The Five Boroughs by Michael L. Strauss, AG. 11/8
  • Using Non-Population Schedules for Context and Evidence by Jill Morelli. 11/10
  • British and Irish research: the differences by Brian Donovan. 11/15
  • Research in Federal Records: Some Assembly Required by Malissa Ruffner, JD, CG. 11/21 (BCG)
  • Understanding Alabama by Rorey Cathcart. 11/29

December 2017

  • Finding Your Roots in Catholic Records by Lisa Salinas. 12/6
  • I Thought He Was My Ancestor: Avoiding the Six Biggest Genealogy Mistakes by James M. Baker, PhD, CG. 12/13
  • Finding Your Nordic Parish of Birth by Jill Morelli. 12/15
  • The Law and the Reasonably Exhaustive (Re)Search by Judy G. Russell, JD, CG, CGL. 12/19 (BCG)
  • Palmetto Pride - South Carolina for Genealogist by Rorey Cathcart. 12/20
  • Problems and Pitfalls of a "Reasonably Shallow Search" by Elissa Scalise Powell, CG, CGL. 12/27

Register


Becoming a Genealogy Detective - free webinar by Sharon Atkins now online for limited time

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The recording of today's webinar, "Becoming a Genealogy Detective" by Sharon Atkins is now available to view at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com for free for a limited time.

Webinar Description

Chances are, if you have spent any time at all working to compile your family history, you have run into difficulty finding at least one elusive relative & maybe even several of them! Within the genealogy community this experience is commonly referred to as a "brick wall." Some of brick walls may seem impossible to solve, today. However, as my mother often told me, "Nothing in life is impossible, some things just take a little longer to accomplish than others." Learn how to approach and solve seemingly complex problems by becoming a "Genealogy Detective".

View the Recording at FamilyTreeWebinars.com

If you could not make it to the live event or just want to watch it again, the 1 hour 47 minute recording of "Becoming a Genealogy Detective" PLUS the after-webinar party is now available to view in our webinar library for free for a limited time. Or watch it at your convenience with an annual or monthly webinar membership.

Webinar Memberships/Subscriptions

Webinar Members get:

  • On-demand access to the entire webinar archives (now 446 classes, 621 hours of genealogy education)
  • On-demand access to the instructor handouts (now 2,036 pages)
  • On-demand access to the live webinars' chat logs
  • 5% off all products at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com (must be logged in at checkout)
  • Access to all future recordings for the duration of their membership
  • Chance for a members-only door prize during each live webinar
  • Access to register for bonus members-only webinars
  • Ability to view which webinars you are registered for
  • Use of the playlist, resume watching, and jump-to features

Introductory pricing:

  • Annual membership: $49.95/year
  • Monthly membership: $9.95/month

Click here to subscribe.

Register for our upcoming webinars (free)

  • Becoming a Genealogy Detective by Sharon Atkins. December 7.
  • From the Heartland - Utilizing Online Resources in Midwest Research by Luana Darby. December 14.
  • Tracing Your European Ancestors by Julie Goucher. December 16.
  • No, no, Nanette! What negative evidence is... and isn't by Judy Russell, JD, CG, CGL. December 20. Hosted by the Board for Certification of Genealogists.
  • An Introduction to BillionGraves by Garth Fitzner. December 21.
  • Strategies to Find the Most Challenging Ancestors with Autosomal DNA Data by James M. Baker, PhD, CG. January 4.
  • Tips and Tricks to Organizing Your Genealogy by Shannon Combs-Bennett. January 11.
  • Legacy Family Tree for Complete Beginners by Geoff Rasmussen. January 13.
  • Writing Up Your Research by Michael J. Leclerc, CG. January 17.
  • Create a Free Google Earth Historic Map Collection for Your Research by Lisa Louise Cooke. January 18.
  • Playing Nice In The Genealogy Sandbox by Thomas MacEntee. January 25.
  • Photography for Genealogy by Nicka Smith. February 1.
  • The WHO of Genetic Genealogy by Blaine Bettinger. February 8.
  • Deciphering German Script by Gail Blankenau. February 10.
  • Be Your Own Digital Archivist: Preserve Your Research by Cyndi Ingle. February 15.
  • Weaving DNA Test Results into a Proof Argument by Karen Stanbary, CG. February 21.
  • Finding Missing Persons With DNA Testing by Diahan Southard. February 22.
  • Apprentices, Indentured Servants, and Redemptioners: White Slavery in America by Peggy Clemens Lauritzen, AG. March 1.
  • 50 Websites Every Genealogist Should Know by Gena Philibert-Ortega. March 8.
  • Home on the Range: Kansas Research Tips by Cari Taplin, CG. March 10.
  • Why are Irish records so weird? by John Grenham. March 15.
  • Are You My Grandpa? Men of the Same Name by Rebecca Whitman Koford, CG. March 21.
  • Picture This: Images You Can Freely Use by Judy G. Russell, JD, CG, CGL. March 22.
  • Introduction to Quaker Genealogy Research by Craig Scott, MA, CG, FUGA. March 29.
  • Preserve, Share, and Search Your Digital Pictures with Google Photos by Geoff Rasmussen. April 5.
  • Your Whiteboard in the Cloud: Trello for Genealogists by Lisa Alzo. April 12.
  • Complete Photo Restoration in 4 Easy Steps by Eric Basir. April 14.
  • The Genealogy in Government Documents by Rick Sayre, CG, CGL, FUGA. April 18.
  • Neighborhood Reconstruction: Effective Use of Land Records by Mary Hill, AG. April 19.
  • Finding and Using Land Ownership Maps by Rick Sayre, CG, CGL, FUGA. April 26.
  • Researching Criminal Records by Ron Arons. April 28.
  • Take Me Back to Where I Belong: Transportation Records of the Freedmen’s Bureau by Angela Walton-Raji. May 3.
  • Beginning Danish Research by Charles Fritz Juengling, AG. May 10.
  • New York City and State Governmental Vital Records by Jane Wilcox. May 12.
  • MAXY DNA: Correlating mt-at-X-Y DNA with the GPS by Debbie Parker Wayne, CG, CGL. May 16.
  • Remember Me: Lifestreaming and the Modern Genealogist by Thomas MacEntee. May 17.
  • WikiTree: Free for All without a Free-for-All by Eowyn Langholf. May 24.
  • The Great War: Researching Your World War I Ancestors by Michael L. Strauss, AG. May 31.
  • Researching Your Minnesota Ancestors by Paula Stuart-Warren, CG, FMGS, FUGA. June 7.
  • How Harry Potter Can Teach You About DNA by Blaine Bettinger. June 14.
  • What Now? Your Next Steps with Autosomal DNA Testing by Diahan Southard. June 16.
  • Beating the Bushes: Using the GPS to Find Jacob Bush's Father by Elissa Scalise Powell, CG, CGL. June 20.
  • Virtual Family Reunions: Super Easy, Super Fun by Pat Richley and Russ Worthington. June 21.
  • Canada's Top 10 by Kathryn Lake Hogan. June 28.
  • Censational Census Strategies by Mary Kircher Roddy. July 5.
  • Google Books: the tool you should use every day! by Lisa Louise Cooke. July 12.
  • Tips for Snapping Pics: How to Take Perfect Family Photographs by Jared Hodges. July 14.
  • Analyzing Documents Sparks Ideas for Further Research by Angela Packer McGhie, CG. July 18.
  • The Firelands, The Connecticut Western Reserve, and the Ohio Territory by Peggy Clemens Lauritzen, AG. July 19.
  • Family History Adhesive: The Science of Why History Binds Families and the Simple Tech of How to Do It by Janet Hovorka. July 26.
  • Tracing Your West Country Ancestors by Kirsty Gray. August 2.
  • A Taxing Matter: Using Tax Lists in Genealogy by Judy G. Russell, JD, CG, CGL. August 9.
  • Using Pictures with Legacy Family Tree by Geoff Rasmussen. August 11.
  • Analyzing Probate Records of Slaveholders to Identify Enslaved Ancestors by LaBrenda Garrett-Nelson, JD, LLM, CG. August 15.
  • Finding Your Ancestors in German Directories by Ursula C. Krause. August 16.
  • How to do Mexican Research and Be Successful by Jonathan Walker. August 23.
  • Getting Started with Evidentia by Edward A. Thompson. August 30.
  • Top Tech Tips for the Technologist and the Genealogist by Geoff Rasmussen. September 6.
  • Finding Isaac Rogers by Nicka Smith. September 13.
  • The ABCs and 123s of Researching Your Ancestor's School Records by Melissa Barker. September 15.
  • When Does Newfound Evidence Overturn a Proved Conclusion? by Tom Jones, Ph.D, CG, CGL. September 19.
  • WolframAlpha for Genealogists by Thomas MacEntee. September 20.
  • Quick Guide to Texas Research by Deena Coutant. September 27.
  • No Easy Button: Using “Immersion Genealogy” to Understand Your Ancestors by Lisa Alzo. October 4.
  • Southern States Migration Patterns by Mary Hill, AG. October 11.
  • Is Your Society Growing? Social Media may be your saving grace by Pat Richley. October 13.
  • Databases, Search Engines, and the Genealogical Proof Standard by David Ouimette, CG. October 17.
  • The WPA: Sources for Your Genealogy by Gena Philibert-Ortega. October 18.
  • Midwestern & Plains States Level Census Records by Paula Stuart-Warren, CG, FMGS, FUGA. October 25.
  • Is this the End? Taking Your German Brick Walls Down Piece by Piece by Luana Darby and Ursula C. Krause. November 1.
  • New York City Genealogical Research: Navigating Through The Five Boroughs by Michael L. Strauss, AG. November 8.
  • Using Non-Population Schedules for Context and Evidence by Jill Morelli. November 10.
  • British and Irish research: the differences by Brian Donovan. November 15.
  • Research in Federal Records: Some Assembly Required by Malissa Ruffner, JD, CG. November 21.
  • Understanding Alabama by Rorey Cathcart. November 29.
  • Finding Your Roots in Catholic Records by Lisa Toth Salinas. December 6.
  • I Thought He Was My Ancestor: Avoiding the Six Biggest Genealogy Mistakes by James M. Baker, PhD, CG. December 13.
  • Finding Your Nordic Parish of Birth by Jill Morelli. December 15.
  • The Law and the Reasonably Exhaustive (Re)Search by Judy G. Russell, JD, CG, CGL. December 19.
  • Palmetto Pride - South Carolina for Genealogist by Rorey Cathcart. December 20.
  • Problems and Pitfalls of a Reasonably Shallow Search by Elissa Scalise Powell, CG, CGL. December 27.

Print the 2017 webinar brochure here.

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How to Access Canadian WW2 Service Records

A few months ago I sent for the military records of my father's brother, Clarence E. McGinnis. I knew Uncle Clare had been in WW2 as I have several photos of him in uniform. But I never knew where he served, what unit he was in, or what he did during the War.

Clare McGinnis WW2
Photo owned by Lorine McGinnis Schulze



World War 2 Canadian records are restricted. Note that there are no access restrictions on the service files for members of the Canadian Armed Forces who died in service. But the restricted records can be accessed with a bit of time. They are worth the time spent to obtain them, as they can include documentation about enlistment, discharge, military units served with, and may also include other documents concerning medical history, medals awarded, personal evaluation reports and dental charts.

Library and Archives Canada holds military service files for those who served after 1918. Their website explanation of who can access what files and how to obtain them is a bit confusing, so I'll share  with you what I did. It was simple.

I wrote a one page letter requesting the complete military service files for [individual's name] who was born [individual's full birth date or estimated year] in [name of city/town plus county and province in Ontario] to parents [names of father and mother].

I included my uncle's death date and a photograph of his tombstone as proof of death. Interestingly enough they actually returned the photo to me!

That was it. I mailed the letter and photo to

ATIP and Personnel Records Division
Library and Archives Canada
395 Wellington Street
Ottawa, ON  K1A 0N4


You can also fax your request to them at this number: 613-947-8456

Your request can be written as a letter or you can print off a blank copy of the Application for Military Service Information form [PDF file 663 KB] also available in Rich Text Format [RTF file 44,516 KB], which should be filled in, signed and sent by mail or fax.

WW2 Uncle Clare Envelope

After a wait of about 5 months a very large package arrived with Uncle Clare's complete military file. I estimate there are about 80 or more pages.  The wait was not unexpected as it is made clear on the Library & Archives Canada website that they are backlogged and requests can take up to 6 months to fill.

There was a lot of interesting information in the military file for Uncle Clare - such as details of his work history prior to enlisting. It include what he was paid! I wish my dad's files had been as complete.

I am really pleased to have some more details to add to my knowledge of my uncle. I knew him quite well but he never spoke of his military service or his early years. I suppose I was too young for him to think I'd be interested.


But I'm really enjoying reading through his files to find out where he went during the war (to England and France) and what he saw and did during that difficult time.

For more information on finding ancestors who were in the Canadian Military during other years you might want to check out The Canadian Military Project.

For WW1 personnel files you will be able to view these online very soon. Library and Archives Canada is busy scanning and uploading the full files to the online CEF Searchable database.


Other WW2 Links

Second World War Service Files: Canadian Armed Forces War Dead
http://www.bac-lac.gc.ca/eng/discover/military-heritage/second-world-war/second-world-war-dead-1939-1947/Pages/files-second-war-dead.aspx

Last Post: Legion Magazine
https://legionmagazine.com/en/last-post/

Since 1928, Legion Magazine has honoured those Canadians who have served their country by publishing in print short death notices for Royal Canadian Legion members with military backgrounds, Canadian war veterans and Legion members with police service.

Books of Remembrance
http://www.veterans.gc.ca/eng/remembrance/memorials/books

The seven Books of Remembrance housed in the Memorial Chamber in the Peace Tower of the Canadian Parliament Buildings in Ottawa are illuminated manuscript volumes recording the names of members of the Canadian Forces and Canadian Merchant Navy killed on active service in wartime, and in other conflicts. Once you find your relative's name, you can view the actual page and you can also find out the exact date when that page will be displayed in the Peace Tower.

Canadian Virtual War Memorial
http://www.veterans.gc.ca/eng/remembrance/memorials/canadian-virtual-war-memorial

The names inscribed in the Books of Remembrance can also be found in the Canadian Virtual War Memorial.

 

Learn more about Canadian genealogy research from these webinars in the Legacy webinar library: http://familytreewebinars.com/canada

 

Lorine McGinnis Schulze is a Canadian genealogist who has been involved with genealogy and history for more than thirty years. In 1996 Lorine created the Olive Tree Genealogy website and its companion blog. Lorine is the author of many published genealogical and historical articles and books.

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Vertical Files: What Are They and How to Use Them - new Legacy QuickGuide now available

Legacy QuickGuidesTM have quickly become one of the more popular resources for genealogists. Each guide contains four (sometimes five, sometimes more) pages of valuable information covering a variety of genealogy research topics, dozens of clickable links, and are written by genealogists and family historians who are experts in the subject areas. We've added another new Legacy QuickGuide: Vertical Files: What Are They and How to Use Them by Melissa Barker. Now choose from 83 Legacy QuickGuides!

Vertical FilesScrapbooks: A Genealogist’s Gold Mine - 2.95  

Vertical files, also called subject files, are a collection of miscellaneous documents and ephemera organized in file folders and stored in filing cabinets. These files are a hodge-podge of records that have been donated to the archive and could contain any kind of records that would fit into a file folder.

The Vertical Files: What Are They and How to Use Them Legacy QuickGuide™ contains useful information including a review of how to locate vertical files, how to access individual documents and use them in research and more. This handy 4-page PDF guide can be used on your computer or mobile device for anytime access.
 
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Register for Webinar Wednesday - Becoming a Genealogy Detective by Sharon S. Atkins

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Chances are, if you have spent any time at all working to compile your family history, you have run into difficulty finding at least one elusive relative & maybe even several of them! Within the genealogy community this experience is commonly referred to as a "brick wall." Some of brick walls may seem impossible to solve, today. However, as my mother often told me, "Nothing in life is impossible, some things just take a little longer to accomplish than others." Learn how to approach and solve seemingly complex problems by becoming a "Genealogy Detective".

Join us and Sharon S. Atkins for the live webinar Wednesday, December 7, 2016 at 2pm Eastern U.S. Register today to reserve your virtual seat. Registration is free but space is limited to the first 1,000 people to join that day. Before joining, please visit www.java.com to ensure you have the latest version of Java which our webinar software requires. When you join, if you receive a message that the webinar is full, you know we've reached the 1,000 limit, so we invite you to view the recording which should be published to the webinar archives within an hour or two of the event's conclusion.

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About the presenter

SharonAtkins-144x144An avid genealogist since 1980, Sharon is passionate about genealogy research and sharing the excitement of the pursuit of family history with others to help them find "their personal connection to history." Sharon launched her genealogy business; It's All Relatives in 2012, after retiring from a life-time career in sales and marketing. She is a popular speaker and teacher of "how to" genealogy classes who thrives on sharing the excitement of genealogy, coaching other family history researchers and performing genealogy research for clients. In addition to authoring the newly released book, The P.E.O. Founders' Scrapbook, Sharon has authored Legacy QuickGuides: Unraveling Brick Wall Mysteries, Cemetery ResearchUnderstanding US Vital Records and Ephemera: Genealogy Gold.

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  1. Register at www.FamilyTreeWebinars.com today. It's free!
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We look forward to seeing you all there!


A Melting Pot of Money and Manners: Researching Newport’s Bellevue Ave Neighborhood in the 1880 Census

Researching Newport’s Bellevue Ave Neighborhood in the 1880 Census

The evidence of Newport’s pre-eminence in the world of money is clear from one glance at the 1880 US Federal Census.  Ignore the names and look at the occupations and places of birth. Children born while their parents were working overseas. Servants from so many countries it’s a wonder they could communicate with each other and their employers.  A long list of jobs meant to support the tiny families living in big houses.

Census enumerations keep a basic record of who’s where. Addresses. Birthplaces. Occupations. The amount of detail provided depends on the census and when enumerators captured that information. In the 1880 census that date was June 1st. It was the second decade of the period that Mark Twain later named The Gilded Age.  Wealth expressed in property and lifestyles.  Robin Leach, host of Lifestyles of the Rich and Famous (1984-1995) would have had a field day.

Browsing the census at the beginning of the summer season of 1880, is a who’s who of nineteenth century personalities. Newport was the place to be seen.

Max Outrey lived on Narragansett Boulevard with his wife steps from the Atlantic Ocean along with their three children and seven servants—private cooks, maids and a butler. His occupation. French Minister. Not a clergyman, but the Minister of France who worked with Presidents and Senators in Washington, D.C.  His household staff was primarily French, with the exception of one woman from Norway and one born in Washington, D.C.

Next-door were John Carey, Jr. and his wife living in their home known as Grasslands. He was a retired metallurgic engineer. They had nine servants from England, Ireland, Massachusetts and New York. Mrs. Carey was the former Mary Alida Astor, daughter of William Astor, of the New York Astors.

In the winter these families lived in Washington, D.C. and New York City but in the summer the social season revolved around Newport. Local newspapers ran columns discussing who was renting which houses and who was in town.

Along Bellevue Avenue stands a series of buildings that stood when the Carey’s and Outrey’s visited.  In July 1880, the Newport Casino opened with grass tennis courts. The building and the grounds are now the International Tennis Hall of Fame.  It was one of the first social clubs that included sports activities. You can still play tennis on the original horseshoe court!

The Newport Casino, now the building and the grounds are now the International Tennis Hall of Fame
The Newport Casino

It’s not surprising that New York businesses that relied on wealthy patrons would also travel to Rhode Island following the money and opportunities. Photographer Louis Alman, who operated studios in both Newport and New York, moved seasonally with his clients beginning circa 1885. He set up his studio on Bellevue Avenue. Down the street was the internationally famous Notman Photographic Studio, which operated establishments in major cities in the U.S., Canada and elsewhere. Every day coachmen drove their employers down Bellevue Avenue in a parade of envy.    

Alman’s city directory listing mentioned that his studio was near Ocean House. It was a significant well-known local landmark. Ocean House was a much-copied symbol of first class nineteenth century tourism located near the Casino. Built in 1846 the Gothic-inspired structure replaced the original Ocean House that burned down in 1845 only a year after being built.  Bigger and better than its predecessor, it was a five-story hotel featuring two hundred and fifty feet of frontage along Bellevue Avenue and accommodations for over four hundred guests.   It is now a parking lot.  Alman knew with that many guests in the area he was bound to get business.

He photographed this woman with her well-groomed poodle in the 1880s. Based on her dress and the dog she was likely a summer visitor. The dog is a pampered pet, likely kept clean, trained and groomed by a servant. A luxury.  Her owner wears the latest style of dress with a modest bustle and a summer style straw turban shaped hat. Her side pose not only shows off the shape of her silhouette, but also presents the best qualities of her canine, reaching for a treat from her gloved hand.  In this period, photo studios used architectural details like balustrades and fake grass to make it appear their customers posed outside. The painted backdrop in the background makes it clear this was taken indoors.

Photo by photographer Louis Alman
Photo by photographer Louis Alman

Unfortunately, this cabinet card ended up discarded. No name on the back and no history of ownership to link it to a family.

If you want to see how the wealthy lived in nineteenth century Newport, RI you can browse the census looking for particulars about where they resided. On Ancestry.com, select the 1880 census then on the right hand side of the screen select browse, then Rhode Island for the state, Newport County and then Newport (ED 95). Street names appear along the left hand edge of the census page. Watch for Bellevue Avenue and Narragansett Avenue to see how the affluent lived.

Learn more about Rhode Island and photographic research in Maureen's Legacy Webinars.

 

Maureen A. Taylor is an internationally known photo detective who specializes in solving photo mysteries for clients and organizations. She is also specializes in Rhode Island research. Learn more about Maureen at www.maureentaylor.com.

 

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Save $10 on all Legacy software PLUS save on QuickGuides, Books and more!

image from news.legacyfamilytree.comJust in time for the holidays - all Legacy Family Tree software is $10 off for a limited time (comes with a FREE upgrade to Legacy 9 when it is released).

We appreciate all of our Legacy users so much and we thank each of you for all of your support over the years. We would like to offer each of you a gift that we think your family and friends will really enjoy.

For a limited time, we are offering three great ways to save:

  1. Save $10 off any new Legacy 8 software purchase for yourself (comes with FREE upgrade to Legacy 9 when it is released).
  2. Save $10 off any new Legacy 8 software purchase for friends and family. There is no limit to the number of Legacys you can buy at this discount price (also comes with FREE upgrade to Legacy 9 when it is released).
  3. Save $2 on the companion book, Legacy Family Tree 9 Unlocked! Techniques, Tips and Step-by-Steps for Using Legacy to Record Your Genealogy by Geoff Rasmussen.

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Also save on Legacy add-ons, videos, Legacy QuickGuides, software and books

Nearly every Legacy add-on, training video set, software, and how-to book has been discounted for this holiday sale, including Thomas MacEntee's 500 Best Genealogy & Family History Tips book (now just $4.95) PLUS our entire line of Legacy QuickGuides.

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Happy holidays to everyone from the Legacy Family Tree team!